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What Twitter resisted releasing to DOJ, and we may presume Facebook did not

So the US Department of Justice wants Twitter’s records on the Wikileaks crew. So what, it’s social media — why expect that spooks can’t follow like everybody else? Except the USG wants to know more than followers or tweets, they want IPs, whose computer, network, when, etc, plus they don’t want persons of interest or the public to know what info they’re gathering. That’s a standard MO when investigating crimes like racketeering, but this is a DoJ fishing expedition with aim to criminalize journalism and whistle-blowing, in the meantime violating the privacy of untold thousands, if you are reading this, very likely yours.

Unless you know Kevin Bacon personally, you are separated by fewer degrees from rop_g, ioerror, birgittaj, Assange and Bradley Manning.

Twitter notified the users named in the December 14 DOJ request, whose lawyers had a judge unveil the document. The government of Iceland has summoned their US envoy to explain what claim the USG can make to personal data on Birgitta Jonsdottir, a member of Iceland’s parliament. Salon has put the fax online which lists the specifics the DoJ is after:

A. The following customer or subscriber account information for each account registered to or associated with Wikileaks …

1. subscriber names, user names, screen names, or other identities;

2. mailing addresses, residential addresses, business addresses, e-mail addresses, and other contact information;

3. connection records, or records of session times and durations;

4. length of service (including start date) and types of service utilized;

5. telephone or instrument number or other subscriber number or identity, including any temporary assigned network address; and

6. means and source of payment for such service (including any credit card or bank account number) and billing records.

B. All records and other information relating to the account(s) and time period in Part A, including:

1. records of user activity for any connections made to and from the Account, including the date, time, length, and method of connections, data transfer volume, user name, and source and destination Internet Protocol address(es);

2. non-content information associated with the contents of any communication or file stored by or for the account(s), such as the source and destination email addresses and IP addresses.

3. correspondence and notes of records related to the account(s).

One thought on “What Twitter resisted releasing to DOJ, and we may presume Facebook did not

  1. Did you notice that they didn’t do the same thing to Rove, Cheney, Rice and Libby? On a relatively small LAN that was actually funded by American taxpayers.

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