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Triple Play! S Se Puede!

....This is a cute video of a 6 yr. old kid pulling off a triple play in a baseball game. S Se Puede! ...Move over MLB, 6-year-old Little Leaguer turns unassisted triple play

Johnny Damon the myth of sports news

Local news on TV gets a scant few minutes of coverage, where the story of the day vies with weather to edge out everything else that isn't fluff. In national news, interviewees can seldom get an answer in edgewise before they're rushed off for the commercial break. "That's all the time we have" ends every news story, yet the day's sports story is paraded before sport desk after sport center. I used to envy the attention Americans gave to sports, until I saw the scrutiny was illusory. For example, Johnny Damon's double stolen base in game four of the World Series. It may stand as the most memorable moment of the series, giving Sunday's game to the Yankees. Damon beat a tag out at second, but continued running because the ball was behind him and there was no adversary guarding third. As I write, I already remind myself of the SNL skit about Norwegians staging their own translation of an American TV crime show. In the spirit of being an outsider I'd like to add that Fox Sports has chosen unfortunate replay graphics, featuring stars bursting from the center of the screen. Most cutaways leave closeups of baseball players, almost all of them chewing and spitting. The graphics seem to erupt from their mouths. The fact that no one was on third wasn't immediately clear to the television audience, for whom third base was out of camera frame. I thought for a minute I was spectating a Playstation game, where a specialist I know can always rundown the pickle, but Damon strode unchallenged to the abandoned base. None had seen such a thing before, such was the hyperbole. With what looked like impulsive genius, Damon confounded fans and critics who'd been comfortable to agree with Damon's own self-deprecating image as a dumb jock. Johnny Damon's stolen third base was the talk of the post play-by-play. It turns out the Phillies had made a Mark Teixeira shift which left the base exposed. The very semantics offer a clue to the real story, but the jocks dropped it there. The final analysis for the viewers? I'll put it in layman's terms: the Phillies had shifted their players in anticipation of batter Mark Teixeira, who hits to a very consistent hole in the outfield. The shift left the Phillies third baseman to cover second, and the pitcher, if warranted, to watch third. But the pitcher wasn't watching, and as Damon passed the third baseman on second base, he calculated that he could outrun both of them to the empty base. Great story, no one is credited an error, New York shorn Johnny Damon emerges a strategist, and the authenticity of the surprise of adrenalin rush which Damon gave the viewers is affirmed. But might not the media team calling the game have served the audience better if they'd called the Phillies' unusual position shift? The sportcasters deserve the error on this play, but mostly I think for their lack of post game candor. Both infield and

Ask Alex Rodriguez how he does Tic Tacs

A-Rod held a press conference to explain his now admitted steroid use, a mistake he blamed on his youth, when he was 24-26. While the "Boli" which Rodriguez got through his cousin, over the counter in the Dominican Republic, remains a mystery. Rodriguez claimed he did not know it was a steroid. Asked why he kept the twice-a-month for-three-years injections a secret, he admitted he knew "We weren't taking Tic Tacs." The comparison might be a dismissive reference to the innocuous breath mint, but it implies a small pill taken orally, doesn't it? For your breath. Can you inject a Tic Tac? Maybe it's time to ask: what in professional sports circles is a "Tic Tac" injection?

Alaskan anti-Palin rally drew record numbers, CoSprings rally not so many…

as a baseball game. One in which there is no Pennant chance or pennant impact. The Rockies on Tuesday night drew a crowd of 25,000. which is two and a half times as many as turned out for the McCain Palin Lie-Fest a short week and a half ago. The Rox were, unfortunately, mathematically eliminated from the Pennant by the time they were playing the Braves last week. However, they did deliver a really brutal whuppin' to San Diego. There's another McPalin Lie Parade up nawth somewhere, Michigan I think, where the hall would seat 15,000 ... there's seats set aside for 8000 and nobody's making any big run on the tickets. Dunno, must be their rabid support for more Predatory Lending, more Selling America 850 billion dollars worth of rotten dead Corporate Meat, (YUM YUM!!) (which we got for exactly a penny on the dollar, but still, that ain't a bargain folks) and of course the Deregulation that made it all possible. Thank you very much Senator M and Gov. P... But I think I'll pass on my share of your Economic Miracle Whippin' Policies. The Alaskan Rally pulled in a thousand four hundred before anybody stopped counting. I would imagine, from the McMethods used to count the participants at a McRally, they McMight have McRealized that keeping the reported count low would be to their McAdvantage. Straight Lies Express strikes again.

102 Olympic medals for white swimmers

Michael Phelps his poised to beat Mark Spitz's record for medals won in a single Olympics. Does it say something that both are swimmers? Maybe there are too many swimming events? You don't find 1/2 length, or 1/4 length fencing matches. You certainly don't have shooting medley relays. I can understand the merit of 50, 100, 200 and 400 meter distinctions. Relays also make team sorting events out of pretty plainly singular physical efforts. But do we need those variants at the international level which is often dominated by athlete superstars? If you want to have feel-good team events, perhaps relays could exclude the soloists. How do you account for 34 swimming medal events out of a total of only 302 Olympic events. While baseball as an Olympic sport is being dropped? That's two dozen athletes per team being offered no medal, while one swimmer gets a shot at eight. No to mention that baseball has become dominated by athletes of color, while swimming as yet has not. It's easier for our world neighbors to afford a bat and ball than swimming pools. Not to mention the leisure time necessary for the training. Whereas baseball is a social sport. Is it amazing that America, home of the baseball World Series, played only among North American teams, doesn't medal in the real world series? And how about our loss to Cuba? Even as both countries hold baseball to be the national sport, err, pastime, the match-up is still akin to a class AA school set upon single-room schoolhouse classification. We draw our athletes from a population 303 million, including the Cuban players who defect. Cuba's talent comes from a pool of 11 million.

Caps off to Goose Gossage

Tears are free falling this afternoon. Goose Gossage was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame, and it is about damn time. Goose grew up in Colorado Springs, graduated from my alma mater Wasson High School, and went on to play 22 seasons in the major leagues. His story is sweet and inspiring, a tale of hard work and unbridled optimism. It's also an indictment of the powers that be, many of whom seem to understand little about baseball. First eligible for induction in 2000, Gossage was passed over time and time again. I guess his stats didn't clearly illustrate his booming talent. Goose and the Yankees pioneered the concept of the set-up/relief pitcher. One pitcher started the game and threw the team to a lead. The relief pitcher, Goose, came in and "saved" the game. In other words, he didn't throw it away. Goose often had to maintain the lead through 3 long innings. Today's "closers" pitch only the ninth inning so, of course, their stats reflect more saves. "Now it takes three guys to do kind of what I used to do," Gossage pointed out with his usual modesty. Always a hot-tempered and straight-talking guy, Goose didn't take the induction committee's slight laying down. After being passed over several times, he started making a little noise. Several inductees along the way, most notably superstar Cal Ripkin, Jr., publicly bemoaned the fact that Goose Gossage wasn't being inducted alongside him. When Goose was ribbed for flagrant self-promotion, he distanced himself by saying that he didn't want to see injustice prevail. Goose finally got the call this past January. His wife told me that he cried like a baby, so I was worried about him today. In Cooperstown, surrounded by family, friends, fans, former coaches and teammates, I thought his words might get caught in his throat and he'd be unable to speak. Turns out that that was just me. As we've come to expect, Goose was nearly perfect.

Tim Robbins is an activist god

Maybe it's the start of baseball season -- I'm watching the 22nd inning of the Rockies-Padres game! -- that has me remembering the first time I saw the movie Bull Durham. It was a movie that had everything I love -- sport (baseball), romance (Costner and Sarandon) and humor (in the form of an idiotic-yet-talented young pitcher). The imprint of Bull Durham remained on me for a long time. I pictured Crash Davis and Annie Savoy living in Happily Ever After, and hoped that someday I might be as lucky. Imagine my horror when I heard that Susan Sarandon had taken up with, not Crash, but the nimrod pitcher Nuke LaLoosh. In real life! The guy was named Tim Robbins, he was twelve years her junior and, worst of all, he was a complete moron. Or so I thought, and continued to stubbornly think, for many years. Well, no more. Tim Robbins is now the object of my fantasies. He is a guy who is brilliant and passionate about not only sex and sport, but social issues as well. The thing that sets Tim Robbins apart more than anything is his ability to clearly articulate his positions, bravely defy social norms and niceties, cleverly connect historical dots, and positively SKEWER lesser mortals with their idiocy, hypocrisy, dishonesty, immorality and overall worthlessness, while making them laugh at the same time. He is so completely likeable that those who have been ripped to shreds by his razor wit invite him to have another go. When social change is a goal, when mindsets must be shaped and molded, we need more activists like Tim Robbins. People who strike us as pompous and obnoxious, who are heavy-handed and unlikeable, are rarely successful change agents. To educate, to influence, to sway an opinion requires first to be heard. I know that I personally refuse to listen to anyone who browbeats me, provides no inspiration, and displays a complete lack of social awareness. I refuse to cooperate in any way, even if I agree with the vision. I doubt I'm the only one. If you haven't already done so ten times, you should listen to (not read) Tim Robbins' keynote address to the National Association of Broadcasters. He plays the audience in a masterful progression from inculpation to inspiration, while they cling to his every word. In the end he's left them feeling that he's an ally, that they can work together. The broadcasters are free to walk out the door feeling empowered, dignity intact, eyes opened, ready to go. Tim Robbins possesses keen social intelligence. Unlike many activists, he isn't an obstacle to change.

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