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Territorial Manifest Destiny Triumphalism strikes yet again.

Celebrating for Territory Days, (courtesy of the free hand-out paper that’s everywhere on the West Side) the “Heroic” Colonel Chivington, the one who led the Babykilling attempted genocide at Sand Creek. How earlier at Glorieta he had Defeated General Silsby (Texas Militia) and how those bad ol’ Arapaho and Cheyenne bottling off the trails in and out of Denver… and contentedly mooing about how the Utes, on the other hand, being “good Indians” and not joining the Resistance to their Genocidal occupation and robbery. Yeah, pat old Chief Ouray on his long gone head and tell him what good “boy” he was.

I tried, really, to look at it from their point of view. How from their Manifest Destiny outlook the “savages” must have been horrifically frightenning… Naaaahhhh… the Triumphalists went out of their way to paint the Cheyenne and Arapaho as the Taliban, one local historian actually said about what’s now Ft Carson that Colonel Chickensh… errr Chivington and his “men” were fighting an insurgency, a war on terror just like the one in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Nice of him to admit, sideways though it be, that the War Against The People of Iraq and Afghanistan is just another Land and Resource Grab just like the one they pulled off right here a hundred and fifty years ago and that the Taliban actually ARE the legitimate Resistance to Occupation. Oh, and Ouray? Chivington and later Palmer rewarded him for being such a Good “boy” by breaking every single treaty they had made with the Utes, even passing laws which effectively made it a Capital Offense to BE Ute.

Chickenshits on Parade.

And the Sand Creek Massacre was exactly that. A massacre, indiscriminately murdering women, children, elderly, didn’t matter.
Just like in VietRaqistan, every baby killed was an “unlawful combatant” and “radicalized” and “extremist”.
They gilded and polished the Chivington Turd.

Defeating the Confederate slavery army? While doing exactly the same thing to American Indians what the Confederates were doing to American Africans.

I wonder if Chivington ever had Ouray on a whipping-post yelling at him “Yo Name TOBY!”

Brother Jonah
Brother Jonah
Recovering Texan. Christian while and at the same time Anarchist. (like Tolstoy only without the beard, for now) Constantly on the lookout for things which have relevance to things I already know. Autistic. Proud to be Ex- air force. Out of the killing machine for 27 years 4 months and 5 days woohoo!

2 thoughts on “Territorial Manifest Destiny Triumphalism strikes yet again.

  1. Considering how badly they screwed the Ute people in spite of them being the Switzerland of Native America, I don’t doubt that Chivington or Palmer actually DID have people tied to whipping posts.

    If Chief Ouray made any bad decisions, it would be in underestimating the sheer Evil of the Manifest Destiny crowd.
    By the way, “manifest” means both to make manifest and to have already made manifest. You wouldn’t say “manifested”.

    Their “destiny” to rule not only America but the entire world is supposedly both ordained by God and, “manifest” as in readily apparent and obvious. They lie a lot, enslave and murder people and still want to claim the Higher Moral Authority.

  2. There is a little known story associated with the Sand Creek Massacre. Chivingtons daughter Sarah was held captive by Ouray’s tribe when she was 17 years old, after her wagon train ran upon his camp in Ouray. They kept her for collateral/ransom while her husband (Thomas Pollock) left to acquire the money and also free 4 kidnapped Navajo children that were negotiated in the deal. Ouray or Captain Jack had captured the Navajo children earlier and been holding them hostage. Anyway, While at the camp, Sarah conceived a child. The general consensus is that it was Chief Ouray himself who impregnated her. Sarah gave birth to Jessie Fremont Pollock (Chief Ouray’s Daughter and Chivingtons granddaughter). It is believed that this incident is the core of chivingtons hatred for “indians”. That complicates these arguments some but, interestingly, ties the stories together.

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