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Wilfred Owen: Spring Offensive & PTSD

You wont find a more haunting depiction of battle induced PTSD than the last two stanzas of Wilfred Owens Spring Offensive. Youll be curious no doubt to double back on the setup: troops being marched to the frontline, the idyllic lull before battle, the unceremonious charge, and the moment a stealthy sprint turns to mayhem. The next stanza speculates about the fate of those who fall in battle: to bullets, to explosive shells, and to shrapnel. The last stanza is about the "too swift" survivors who "out-fiend" death to come through, and don't want to, or can't, talk about it. 47158

Wilfred Owen: Dulce et decorum est (Pro patria mori – The Old Lie)

The Roman poet Horace wrote "It is sweet and glorious to die for one's country" as Rome shifted from republic to empire. By 1917 British infantryman Wilfred Owen had reduced Horace's sentiment to "The old Lie." Owen was killed in the Great War. His poem wasn't published until 1920 after the war. Even exposed, the old lie went on to adorn many monuments, including, also in 1920, the rising U.S. empire's Arlington National Cemetery. 47142

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