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How to testify at a grand jury: David House “invokes” on Bradley Manning, Julian Assange, & taking illegal notes

Bradley Manning supporter David House was called last year before the grand jury preparing charges against Julian Assange, in the event Assange is successfully remanded to Sweden. Despite being told a transcript was forbidden, House took notes which have now found themselves (A)nonymously online, reproduced here with David House's refrain in bold. Here's Grand Jury, a comedy:   1. Record of proceedings 2. As recorded by David House 3. Grand Jury, Alexandria VA 4. 15 June 2011, 4:10pm to 5pm 5.   6. Inside the Grand Jury: 7. DOJ Counterespionage Section: Attorney Patrick Murphy * 8. DOJ Counterespionage Section: Attorney Deborah Curtis * 9. Eastern District of Virginia: AUSA Bob Wiechering 10. Eastern District of Virginia: AUSA Tracy McCormick 11. Eastern District of Virginia: AUSA Karen Dunn 12. Unspecified number of Grand Jurors 13. Court Steganographer 14. David House 15.   16. Directly outside the Grand Jury: 17. Mike Condon, FBI Agent from Washington, D.C. field office 18. James Farmer, Chief of Anti-Terrorism and National Security Unit at the U.S. Attorney’s Office in D. Mass 19. Peter Krupp, David House’s attorney 20.   21.   22. Record begins: 4:10pm 23. [David House is sworn in and informed of his rights] 24. Patrick Murphy: Would you please state your full name for the record? 25. David House: My name is David House. 26. PM: Did you meet Bradley Manning in January 2010? 27. DH: On the advice of counsel, I invoke my right to remain silent under the Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution. I am concerned that this grand jury is seeking information designed to infringe or chill my associational privacy, and that of others, guaranteed by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution, and that it is using information obtained without a search warrant in violation of the Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution. I define the preceding statement as “invoke”, and when I say “I invoke” in the future I am referring to this statement. 28. Deborah Curtis: Exhibit 1-A? 29. PM: Mr. House, please direct your attention to the screen behind you, exhibit 1-A. 30. DC: I can’t make it bigger. 31. PM: Try… here, remove that bar on the side. 32. DC: That didn’t work. 33. DH: Do you guys need help? 34. DC: We just need to make it bigger. Can everyone see this okay? 35. PM: Ok… we’re going to continue. 36.   37. [A still image from the Frontline PBS special is displayed on the screen. Four figures are standing in front of the BUILDS logo, one figure has her back turned.] 38.   39. PM: Mr. House, can you identify the man on the right? 40. DH: I invoke. 41. PM: Can you identify the man standing second from right? 42. DH: I invoke. 43. PM: Ok, can you identify the person with bright-colored hair, standing here? 44. DH: I invoke. 45. PM: Are we to believe that identifying that individual would somehow incriminate you? 46. DH: On the advice of counsel, I invoke my right to remain silent under the Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution. I am concerned that this grand jury is seeking information designed to infringe or chill my associational privacy, and that of others, guaranteed by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution, and that it is using information obtained without a search warrant in violation of the Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution. 47. PM: Ok, can you identify the man on the left? 48. PM: I would like to observe for the record that

Wikileaks Jacob Appelbaum confounds US customs w Bill of Rights thumbdrive

US-based Wikileaks colleague Jacob Appelbaum has a humorous account of his reentry yesterday to the US. Flying into Newark last July his laptop was searched and his cell phones confiscated. This time Appelbaum tweeted ahead that the ACLU would be his welcoming party, among other measures, recounted through Twitter: Tweets by ioerror I am not practically able to transport electronic devices. I will be radio silent before, during, and for some time after my flight. I think that it is unlikely that there will be any serious trouble. With secret courts and sealed orders… the only way to know is to go. I'm heading to the airport from Reykjavik and expect to be in the US around 16:40 PST Monday afternoon. Perhaps everything will go smoothly. I am out of the airport and back in Seattle. Nothing more for now, sleep time. It's very frustrating that I have to put so much consideration into talking about the kind of harassment that I am subjected to in airports. I was detained, searched, and CBP did attempt to question me about the nature of my vacation upon landing in Seattle. The CBP specifically wanted laptops and cell phones and were visibly unhappy when they discovered nothing of the sort. I did however have a few USB thumb drives with a copy of the Bill of Rights encoded into the block device. They were unable to copy it. The forensic specialist (who was friendly) explained that EnCase and FTK, with a write-blocker inline were unable to see the Bill of Rights. I requested access my lawyer and was again denied. They stated I was I wasn't under arrest and so I was not able to contact my lawyer. The CBP (U.S. Customs and Border Protection) agent was waiting for me at the exit gate. Remember when it was our family and loved ones? When I handed over my customs declaration form, the female agent was initially friendly. After pulling my record, she had a sour face. She attempted to trick me by putting words into my mouth. She marked my card with a large box with the number 1 inside, sent me on my way. While waiting for my baggage, I noticed the CBP agent watching me and of course after my bag arrived, I was "randomly" selected for search. Only US customs has a random number generator worse than a mid-2007 Debian random number generator. Random? Hardly. During the search, I made it quite clear that I had no laptop and no cell phone. Only USB drives with the Bill of Rights. The CBP agent stated that I had posted on Twitter before my flight and that slip ended the debate about their random selection process. The CBP agents in Seattle were nicer than ones in Newark. None of them implied I would be raped in prison for the rest of my life this time. The CBP agent asked if the ACLU was really waiting. I confirmed the ACLU was waiting and they again denied me contact with legal help. All in all, the detainment was around thirty minutes long. They

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