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Steve Bass found guilty of camping not occupying, but could jury have ruled otherwise without hearing his defense?

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo.-- You may have underestimated the importance of today's Camping Ban trial. The local media, social justice community and rights watchdogs missed it. But judging from the police force on hand and the elaborate lock-downs placed on the jury pools, it was evident the City of Colorado Springs thought a lot was at stake. I've written already about the draconian motions to prevent defendant Steve Bass from explaining his motives, including a ban of the word "Occupy." Today the court made audience members remove their "Occupy Colorado Springs" t-shirts, but let the cat out of the bag by the palpable gravitas with which the court officials and police handled jury selection. Except for the absence of TV crews outside, you'd have thought Steve Bass was Hannibal Lector tripped up by an urban camping ordinance at "what happened last year in October at a park downtown." Yeah, even mention of "Acacia Park" was giving away too much, the prosecuting attorney preferred to call it "115 W. Platte Ave." Every so often a prospective juror would stand up and say "I presume you're referring to OCCUPY WALL STREET?" like he was solving a riddle, but instead of the door prize that volunteer would be dismissed from the pool for knowing too much. After a trial that lasted one third the length of the jury selection, Steve Bass was found guilty. He offered no testimony, his lawyer, the very capable Patty Perelo, made no closing statement, because what defense could be made? Steve and his council elected not to have him testify, because to begin with, he'd have to swear to tell the whole truth, and if he explained he could only tell part of the truth, he'd be slapped with Contempt of Court. We thought the jurors might have been curious, after seeing the city's 8x10 glossy pictures with the circles and arrows telling what each one was and hearing not a peep from Bass, but they didn't express it, and left after giving their verdict. This is Colorado Springs. One of the prosecution's witnesses, the arresting officer, nearly spilled the beans when he identified the defendant as someone he couldn't have confused for someone else, because he'd said he'd encountered Bass many times in the park and shared many conversations. "Oh?" the defense attorney Perelo perked her ears and asked, "and WHAT did you talk about?" "Um... homeless policy, mostly." That's all HE could say. He couldn't explain why he'd encountered the defendant so many times, or what the defendant was doing. Attorney Perelo couldn't push it, because that would be leading him into forbidden territory. His testimony for the prosecutor was delivered straight from his notes. There were two police witnesses, a map and several photographs, showing the tent and another showing just the poles. Was this necessary for a conviction? Because it necessitated explaining to the jury that said poles were in their "unerected state". Not to be confused with the tent which was "fully erected", which the judge pronounced like expressions

Steve Bass to get his day in court, but he can’t say what he was doing or why, & above all he can’t mention “Occupy”

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo.-- Municipal Court Judge Spottswood W. F. Williams heard a final motion today before the AUGUST 10 trial of Occupier Steve Bass, charged with violating the city's camping ban. The prosecution motioned to forbid from trial, "discussion of political, economic, or religious beliefs or ideology as a purported justification for the alleged acts", and even "arguments related to the belief that the defendant's conduct was constitutionally protected", and in true Colorado Springs fashion, the judge GRANTED the city's motion! YES THAT'S RIGHT, now if Bass wanted to say he wasn't "camping," he can't say what else you would call it! In effect, Defendant Bass is prevented from explaining WHY he was occupying, or even THAT he was occupying, because saying "OCCUPY" is expressly forbidden. The judge will play it by ear whether to make an exception for himself during "voir dire" if selecting impartial jurors might require asking their opinion of "Occupy". That's IF BASS GETS A JURY AT ALL, because next, Judge Williams prompted the city prosecutor to research whether Bass was entitled to a jury of his peers for the infraction of camping... The issue had already been resolved in an earlier hearing. Unable to find definitive wording on whether a camping ban violation invoked the right to a jury trial, the court ruled to proceed as if it did. But at today's hearing Judge Williams related that in the interim over a casual dinner conversation, another judge informed him that the law read otherwise. So he put the question again to the prosecution. And again the citations came up inconclusive. This time however, with the clerk advised to continue the search, the decision stands at "pending". If Judge Williams opts to eliminate the jury, the forbidding of political or constitutional discussion is a moot point, actually two. There won't be a jury to confuse, nor a judge either, because Judge Williams decided, by allowing the city's motion, that the defendant has no arguments to make. Case closed. If the judge gets his way. The point of today's hearing was to hear not a judge's motion but the city's, a "motion in limine" used to reach agreement about what arguments can be excluded from the trial, often a defendant's prior convictions which might prejudice a jury. The core of the city's motion was this: ...that the Defendant be ordered to refrain from raising the following issues at the Jury Trial... 1. Discussion of political, economic, or religious beliefs or ideology as a purported justification for the alleged acts, or as an issue to be evaluated by the jury; 2. Presentation of facts or arguments related to the belief that the defendant's conduct was constitutionally protected expressive conduct; 3. Presentation of facts or arguments with the primary purpose or effect of proselytizing for the occupy movement, or otherwise using the Courtroom as a public forum; 4. Any reference to settlement negotiations with the Defendant prior to trial; The city is guessing that because defendant Bass has passed on all opportunities to dismiss his case on

The Last Girl Scout

Yesterday marked an invigorating shift for me.   I've been beset by the common malady among Occupiers, wherein the sheer weight of the task at hand and the sly, evasive Jung Fu practiced by the adherents of the Darkness has been a bit stifling. Given the way the City Court in Colorado springs has been summarily dismissing cases arising from the local Occupation, i genuinely feared they would simply drop my camping ticket as a way to sweep the whole business under their now incredibly lumpy rug. After all, when Nic G. was arrested for setting up an occupation at City Hall, his case was summarily dismissed for "lack of evidence." Nic, Michael, and Kristie then drove to the police station to retrieve the three carloads of evidence they had confiscated and were storing there. It seems likely that the real reason the case was dropped was the lack of any legitimate crime. Nic has reported that none of the cops on the scene for his incident had any clue what they were doing. In fact they are recorded by their own equipment responding with befuddlement when asked for what he was being arrested. No shit. "What am I being arrested for; what are the charges?" "We don't know." Apparently even our city's lawyers aren't stupid enough to take that one, though it may well have been simply a harassment strategy. If so, its effectiveness is as yet undetermined. No one has set up any tables or anything at City Hall since, but we've been busy, many of us simply finding ways to avoid freezing to death. The idea is hardly off the table though, one might say. Some weeks back we contacted the National Lawyers' Guild office in Denver and Chuck Nadler from that office sent out a mass email, blah, blah, blah, and i was put in touch with local attorney Patty Perello. Perello had presented difficulty to connect, and in the weeks leading to the rescheduled pre-trial conference yesterday, i developed a sense that she may be of a mind to steer the procedure toward the simplest solution and try to get the charges dropped on technicalities or to persuade me to take one of the cheesy deals the city attorney offered. I was pleasantly disabused of my unwarranted impression when we finally met, 10 minutes past the scheduled moment for the conference to start. We spoke hurriedly for a few minutes about more or less unrelated topics before they called my name and Perello motioned for me to wait while she conferred in the inner sanctum of banal constitutional deconstruction to be found at any courtroom. I held my previous view at this point, that Perello was likely not so different from other overworked and over-avaricious solicitors with whom i'd had previous experience. When she reappeared with not one but two potential lame-ass deals posited by the city, i knew the moment was at hand. "So," i say, bracing for the worst, "just how deep into this pond do you

On #D12 #OccupyCS takes on Walmart, company store of the global plantation.

OCCUPIED COLORADO SPRINGS- Showing the flag today on the Occupy corner of Acacia Park in advance of tomorrow's 12/12 WALMART BOYCOTT. You might well ask why we passed on a sunny, pre-Chrismas shopping weekend to picket the 8th Street Walmart on a MONDAY. Easy. Our boycott is timed with other OCCUPY actions on #D12, the shutdown of Oakland's port by #OccupyOakland and #OccupyDenver's blocking of the Loveland Colorado Walmart distribution center. Solidarity. So we thought we'd dry our new signs today and recruit for tomorrow's event. The cops came early. In the interest of FULL DISCLOSURE, here's the entirety of what was happening on the corner today. Something Native American, related to Hispanic American culture, involving to a troubling degree a number of Catholic clergy, having to do with what, the first occupation? The motorcycle cops were there to escort their procession along Tejon.

Whose streets? Occupy Jack spreads COS occupation to parking spots!

OCCUPIED COLORADO SPRINGS- Why stop at protest tents? Jack's got a protest car, now there are two. Two cars used by Occupy Colorado Springs have now been booted for not paying their way alongside Acacia Park. No homeless allowed, so no homeless cars allowed. The plan? Occupy Cars! Activists are sleeping in shifts, occupying these cars to prevent them being impounded. Did you watch yesterday's video of the Saturday arrests? Jack Semple is a rockstar. If you can help Jack and his fellow occupiers, figure out something, they can use your help. They've already got the outrageous ideas, it's the run of the mill support that will turn the tide.

#Occupy Colo. Springs Municipal Court

OCCUPIED COLORADO SPRINGS- Attention local media, if you're looking for authentic spokespeople for Occupy Colorado Springs, you need look no further than today's front row. Holding the big sign is first arrestee Steve Bass, to his right: three times arrestee Iraq vet Jack Semple, arrestee Amber Hagen, arrestee Raven Martinez, and arrestee Thomas G. Also pictured, former Colorado Congressman Dennis Apuan, Occupy founding member Jon Martinez and Socialist activist Patrick Jay. Not pictured, Joel Aigner and Hossein Forouzandeh who were speaking at a UCCS occupy teach-in. Here's a video of the Saturday arrests of veteran of Fallujah Timothy "Jack" Semple and Amber Hagen of the 7-11 incident. Worth the watch. ROCKSTARS! Mark your calendars, upcoming arraignments are scheduled November 21, 29 and 30. Raven addressed the Colorado Springs City Council today on the unconstitutionality of the no-camping ordinance being enforced to curb the Occupy protest. Here's what she said: As a citizen of the United States, one has a given right to life, liberty, & property. These rights are protected by both the 5th & 14th Amendments to the Constitution. In Bolling v Sharpe, The Supreme Court interpreted the 5th Amendment's due process clause to include an equal protection element. The 14th Amendment states: “No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of the citizens of the United States; nor shall any state deprive any person of LIFE, LIBERTY, or PROPERTY, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.” Knowing that sleep is a necessity of Life, every American citizen has a right to sleep, regardless of status. “HOMELESSNESS” is considered a status. The camping ordinance ultimately denies one the right to sleep, therefore the right to live, based on their status. How many people have been arrested for setting up a canopy, with blankets & food, to take a nap or have a picnic on public property. Now if a homeless person sets up a canopy, has blankets and food with them, will they be told to take down their canopy under the current camping ordinance? If so, then the ordinance is based on status, therefore unconstitutional. If not, then it leaves too much discretion in the hands of the individual law enforcement officer, making the ordinance over-broad and unconstitutionally vague. When one is homeless, where can that person sleep? If they set up to sleep on Public property they would be violating the current city ordinance, they will be told to leave and told of a shelter to go to, being their only alternative. This amounts to incarceration in the shelter without a violation of law having been committed. This also violates ones right to due process in that it allows for arbitrary enforcement. When you criminalize a non-criminal act of necessity, you greatly increase the possibility of that person committing other crimes, as well as decrease that persons ability to obtain employment. State v Folks, No. 96-19569 MM found that a city ordinance which punished innocent conduct, such as sleeping/camping on public property, violated

All in

When i first set out to write this blog i had no intention of writing about geopolitics, or anything any bigger than my own little world, or to develop any sort of readership at all, let alone to kick up international interest. Who knew? Since the time i started, Adbuster's Occupy movement has overtaken the whole world and i've become a part of it, along with apparently millions of fellow humans dissatisfied with aspects of the concentric and overlapping political systems that govern and control the minutiae of our daily lives. Occupy has struck a chord that resonates well beyond what seems to have been its original intent as well. Adbuster asserts in its campaign web-page opener that, "we vow to end the monied corruption of our democracy," speaking, one assumes of U.S. democracy, even though Adbusters is a Canadian publication founded by Kalle Lasn, an Estonian. Adbusters itself claims to be a, "global network of culture jammers and creatives," and that their Occupy is, "[i]nspired by the Egyptian Tahrir Square uprising and the Spanish acampadas." One should note that Adbusters is a non-profit organization with aspirations and effect well beyond the confines of the magazine at its core. Many of my dear intrepid friends struggle mightily with the unavoidable nature of the movement in which we all participate. Occupy Colorado Springs, (OCS), has garnered a fair amount of attention both because of its early acquisition of a city permit to camp on the sidewalk, and for its fragmentary infighting. Strong personalities have clashed fairly spectacularly for what scale we're dealing with here, and precisely the same arguments are on display at Occupy web-pages all over the U.S., as well as abroad. Here, many patriotic, nationally oriented players have concentrated on addressing the U.S. Constitution and the influence of corporate interests in Washington, D.C. politics. Others have been caught up in causes of personal concern as the "focus" of the overall movement has grown more and more diffuse. The bickering and difficulty in reaching consensus has been frustrating but, i suggest, not unhealthy or out of place. Adbusters, following ques from the Middle East and Spain, deliberately set off a "leaderless" movement, and has fastidiously avoided taking hold of any sort of control of what has developed since, refusing even media interviews for fear of exercising undue influence. Occupy remains a leaderless movement. Various groups and individuals have issued lists of demands; the one linked there, "is representative of those participating on this [particular 'Occupy Wall Street' Facebook] page." We Occupiers have much common ground, which has served well to bring us all together, and will continue to serve as we gather to discuss and bicker over issues and particulars. There is plenty to differentiate amongst us as well, on individual and other categorical bases, but we have recognized, more or less, an essential humanity that has us willing to stand in freezing temperatures if we live in the northern hemisphere, and subject ourselves to the slow, often painful process of

Occupy Colo. Springs suffers SECOND ARREST for camping outside permit

COLORADO SPRINGS- Tonight's 11 O'clock arrest in Acacia Park was the second for #OCCUPYCS. As contentious GAs can attest, the self-delegated city-liaison executive-members are fighting a losing battle with a dissenting membership determined to grow the OWS protest by stressing inclusion and enlarging the encampment to beyond the city-permitted canopies.

Interlude 2

Off to Acacia Park for the night, then Denver in the morning. Occupy! is fully international. We'll need to come to terms with that in our own countries, cities, minds, and act accordingly, cooperatively, if we are to truly build a thing of beauty without a ridiculous cataclysm. Continue to embrace Humanity in everyone! Cops and soldiers, bankers and beggars--all of us are just working the Gameboard as seems best to us at the time. Pull back. Breathe. Shine the Light! The Game's over. Learn to Dance!

Legal artistry

(In response to questions received on another forum: "I'm curious as to why, exactly, you feel that you are entitled to stay in a public park at all?", "What makes you feel that you are entitled to enjoy the 'right' of pursuing your happiness -- that is, living in Acacia park -- without having to contribute monetarily to the upkeep of that public facility.. Furthermore, why is it that you believe that, in the interest of effecting a change in a law which you disagree with, the best course of action is to choose to voluntarily break said law, rather than getting involved in the legal process and effecting a change in the typical fashion? After all, all that really accomplishes is an additional waste of taxpayer-funded services, in this case law enforcement.") I'll reiterate again before i take this on that these are profoundly excellent questions that i think every Occupier, observer, and citizen of any country ought to contemplate deeply before entering the fray--maybe even before leaving the house this morning. First I should clarify what may amount to a few misconceptions wrought largely by the media of late. As has been reported I am living with dear friends who find my comfort to be a valuable thing and have extended their hospitality freely absent any solicitation on my end. J. Adrian Stanley of the CS Independent has referred to me as a "technically homeless...couch[-]surf[er]," which is true, though only by certain technical legal definitions, which are generally designed to either skirt or address issues involving benefits of some sort. I am "technically" employed as the sole proprietor of the Paint Squad, a remodeling company that has been defunct for practical purposes since the media began trumpeting a new Great Depression, and the guy i had been working with abandoned the project. For the record, i collect no unemployment, disability, food stamps, or any other money or benefits of any kind from the government. Plainly stated, i have no monetary income. This is not meant to offer ethical assessment of my situation nor to elicit sympathy or whatever, but is merely offered to add perspective to my positions, and to rectify factual errors that have made it into the mix. Bear in mind i was camping at Acacia Park not out of necessity, but to effect the specific outcome that you may observe to have been effected. Note that although hundreds of campers are now down along Fountain Creek in violation of the same ordinance, they are not at Acacia Park kicking the bee's nest with me--they have different and rather more imminent needs than i. I believe i adequately responded to Mark's first question by directing him to the appropriate pages here at hipgnosis. The second is a continuation of the first, with the addenda about "contributing monetarily." A response must necessarily involve the natures of money, property and its use, and our interaction amongst ourselves as human beings. The third involves political processes and movements, civil disobedience, and

CSPD acquires urban assault vehicle. What line have activist informants been feeding them?

COLO. SPRINGS- This image just in from a reconnoiter of the downtown police garage. The CSPD has mobilized an urban assault vehicle, for, I don't know what, keeping up with the Jones's? Ever since Springs police decided that the Pikes Peak Justice & Peace Commission held gravitational pull over all political dissent in El Paso County, the CSPD holds weekly briefings with a PPJPC staffer, and of late they've added morning tete-a-tetes with an OCCUPY delegate from Acacia Park. What are those "representatives" telling them? That law enforcement needs bigger ammo? Would now be the time to suggest we call organizers who grease the mechanisms of oppression, however ill-conceived their intention, by a more appropriate term, RATS? I can understand neighbors with differing opinions about whether cops need more helicopters, or K-9 intimidation duos, but how ever does the ordinary citizen rationalize that their police department needs riot equipment? To protect us from ourselves? We found out a couple years ago that the CSPD has a busload of their own people-suppression gear. Now we have an armored personnel carrier for cops? Because they can't drag defenseless nonviolent protesters across the pavement without mechanization? The Acacia Park protesters have been happy to seek permits to set up their literature canopies and have organized community service cleanup actions to put a shine on their model compliance, meanwhile the police are arming up... EPILOG: Is this a political cheap shot? Yes. It's trash talk. No argument. Why and when Colorado Springs took delivery of an armored vehicle is entirely conjecture. Maybe it's the usual cost-plus profiteering scheme. That's not really the point. The point is, what intelligence is CSPD getting from their de facto adversaries? The sight of a new armored vehicle to use against civilians should be a major embarrassment to someone who considers themselves tasked with offering assurances to the city that all local protest will be inoffensive and dismissible. The CSPD needs armor WHY? Not even crime here has ever escalated to a level which would require an armored assault by the police. I was content to leave it at that, but oh well, some people need it explained. It is not conceivable that anything public citizen advisers might have whispered at regular meetups would have prompted the CSPD to armor up. But what are the collaborators conferring with police about? We know the why, for a seat at the table, so what goals are they selling out? It would be false praise to suggest the PPJPC had a role in bringing the armored UAV to town. But the PPJPC cannot escape responsibility for eroding the role and breadth of activism in this city. In particular for playing informant to the CSPD, for being the conduit of intimidation which the police want to push the other way, and for employing an executive director who has a personal resolve against confrontational activism. You won't see him at protests, organizing protests, or promoting protests. You'll see him keeping his meetings with other respectable nonprofit heads, and his appointments

Colorado Springs issues permit to sleep on sidewalk but without tents. Let Them Eat Concrete

COLO. SPRINGS- I'm not crazy about OCCUPY organizers negotiating with city representatives for a tentative permit to occupy Acacia Park. You don't need permits for free speech, nor does activism gain by the advice of cops. That said, allowing a protest encampment, even without tents, may grow participation more effectively than outrage over oppressive responses to civil disobedience. So what's come of this strategy today is the same permission that has been granted to the Wall Street activists in Zuccotti Plaza, sleeping bags but no tents. Doesn't that seem shamelessly punitive? Shelter is a human right, deprivation of which is a violation of the 14th Amendment. It's likely the city could be held liable for endangering the health and lives of these activists. So permits or not? No American citizen needs permission to express himself, and whatever means you have to conspire to shut down Wall Street are not going to be allowed. So should an occupation seek a permit? The physics of military occupation are Might Makes Right, not Simon Says. But military intelligence and diplomats play invaluable roles. Might makes right, but guile and craft save the occupiers manpower and lives. Maybe permits create the beachhead with which the American people get their size 99 shoe in the door. Holding regular meetups with the police is another dilemma. I know I'm not shrewd enough to go head to head with a police department, its vast intelligence resources, and well practiced dissent-quashing strategies. For me a most significant element of the public demonstration is law enforcement's incapability of predicting unregulated behavior. The 14th Amendment forbids the state to "deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law." So we might well pause to consider another news story which emerged today, that the US citizen assassinated by CIA drones in Yemen, wasn't riding in a convoy as previously claimed, but at a dinner party with a 16-year-old relative and his friends, all of them killed without trial or even legal charges. At its simplest the 14th Amendment says you can't punish someone before properly found guilty. Forcing inhumane conditions upon a citizen exercising his rights is punitive, cruel and unusual. In Denver today a similar delegation met with the mayor, who give his permission for protests to continue, as it was his to give, for his subjects to exercise their 1st Amendment Rights, but abridged to exclude at night, in the cold, or in city park. Specifically the Denver mayor said he'd allow them to sleep on sidewalks provided they're exposed to the elements. No tents. Let them eat concrete. The Colorado Springs city attorney gave instruction to formalize the handicap with a permit. They can sleep on sidewalks but no shelter allowed. Want a cold or flu? Have at it. A provocative thought, however sad: will today's protesters submitting their bodies to rain, cold and snow, submitting their health and spirits to debilitating hardship, streamed live on the internet, will it have a similar effect as images of water hoses on

Should homeless camping ban apply to Occupy Colorado Springs protest? Homelessness is often also protest.

COLORADO SPRINGS- Activist Steve Bass was arrested last night for overstaying his welcome in the city's Acacia Park, violating the ordinance against pitching a tent in a public park. While the city is asserting that the anti-homeless no-camping ordinance ban applies to overnight free speech and assembly, and the OCCUPY COLORADO SPRINGS protesters argue that protest should be differentiated from the homeless issue, Steve reminds us that for many on the street, homelessness is their protest. Bass has longtime experience administrating the Sunday morning soup kitchen at CC's Shove Chapel. According to Bass, it's not a matter of "To be or not to be" but the unalienable right to be or be somewhere else. Here's an excerpt from his statement: A point is advanced during the meeting [Occupy Colorado Springs negotiations with City officials] that separates homeless campers from active political occupiers. As a matter of personal opinion, though there are some real differences in context, the camping ordinance is bad law as yet untested in courts. However, having been involved with the free food biz in Colorado Springs for decades I am confident in stating that many homeless campers are in their position by choice, having opted out of a political system found onerous. I see no legitimate difference between this lifestyle of protest and the pointed expressions of protest embraced by Occupy Colorado Springs. Other homeless campers are thus because of uncontrolled habits, some of which fall under the label of "diseased" behavior by authoritative bodies in the U.S. or because of circumstances external to their control. There are only two varieties of property in the entirety of the U.S.--public or private. If the continuously burgeoning population of homeless campers is barred from sleeping on public property, and have no means by which to acquire access to private property, they have no option at all. Others are then required by default to put them up, thus far manifest here in conditions both unsanitary and unsavory as demonstrable by the bed-bug ridden Express Inn or the Aztec Motel, or else the Salvation Army--court ordered church. Otherwise, our only other option is to incarcerate them. I maintain that an unmentioned and "unalienable" right of all human beings is simply to be, wherever that being may take place.

To be or to be somewhere else

An attempt to address a few issues presented here in as brief a fashion possible: Re: “Occupy Colorado Springs hits legal wall.” Regardless of the opinions of any observer or participant in any protests currently under way here or across the country, police are likely to follow the direction of their superiors, apart from unauthorized behavior on the part of mavericks or rogues. Jason points out that the Bill of Rights "trumps" city ordinances and statutes, and if that is not true then I am personally inclined to object strenuously and if necessary physically, in the sense that I will camp "illegally" with the occupiers during the course of the current protestations. A point is advanced during the meeting that separates homeless campers from active political occupiers. As a matter of personal opinion, though there are some real differences in context, the camping ordinance is bad law as yet untested in courts. However, having been involved with the free food biz in Colorado Springs for decades I am confident in stating that many homeless campers are in their position by choice, having opted out of a political system found onerous. I see no legitimate difference between this lifestyle of protest and the pointed expressions of protest embraced by Occupy Colorado Springs. Other homeless campers are thus because of uncontrolled habits, some of which fall under the label of "diseased" behavior by authoritative bodies in the U.S. or because of circumstances external to their control. There are only two varieties of property in the entirety of the U.S.--public or private. If the continuously burgeoning population of homeless campers is barred from sleeping on public property, and have no means by which to acquire access to private property, they have no option at all. Others are then required by default to put them up, thus far manifest here in conditions both unsanitary and unsavory as demonstrable by the bed-bug ridden Express Inn or the Aztec Motel, or else the Salvation Army--court ordered church. Otherwise, our only other option is to incarcerate them. I maintain that an unmentioned and "unalienable" right of all human beings is simply to be, wherever that being may take place. Jason points out the tenuous Constitutional position of the camping ordinances in a reasonably clear manner. The position of the police is clear and understandable, though I believe they are mistaken about the issues with city statutes; they will do as directed by others. Some of us affiliated with with the Occupiers, including I, believe arrest followed by courtroom examination of these and other questions may be seen as a good thing, and would result in the elimination of obviously untenable, ill-conceived statutes that are currently being enforced only in the most visible and problematic cases anyway. This describes some of the entanglement of the only somewhat separate matters of Occupiers in Colorado Springs, and campers in Colorado Springs. Without more than this brief mention, it also demonstrates the erosion of liberty in this country that precipitates the protests in the

Revolution at 2112 RPM

For Tom, the guys at Occupy Colorado Springs, and everyone else: So, if I sit here and carry on about how we can get out of this grief under which so many of us find ourselves buried by living cooperatively, and no one plays along, it's like division by zero, an operation that produces no definable solution and the thought of which is so troublesome it caused philosopher George Berkeley to suspect all mathematicians could be devil-worshipers on the side. Seriously. A new friend I met at Acacia Park yesterday asked where the little hullabaloo about banks and bailouts and revolution and such was happening in Colorado Springs was asking the general milieu of rabble rousers where their revolution could be expected to go. (Hi, Tom). Some of the guys there, as one might expect, were so fed up with the obviously unsupportable state of current affairs that they were almost gleefully anticipating violence and war--civil war--right here in the U.S.A.. (Hi, Pat). I certainly can't blame anyone for thinking that way, given that I hoped fervently for exactly the same outcome from around the 3rd grade til only recently, really. I've already mentioned my opinion of the futility of standard issue revolutions. We've tried that. It doesn't work. We've tried Monarchies, ordinary dictatorships, "working-class dictatorships", Capitalism, Communism, Socialism, Ism after Ism--none of what we've tried to do has worked, neither for the oppressed nor the oppressors. We've been dividing by zero all the while. You should look that operation in the eye some, so you know what I'm saying. It's the same as proving a negative, or trying to work out the math of the Singularity, and if you find it difficult, one glance at a graph will turn the lights on a little for you. When I was a schoolboy, I always thought it was supremely bogus to respond to any questions about division by zero, (or other imponderables, for that matter), by asserting the answers to be "undefined" just because a conventional answer might be unsatisfactory. I was a weird kid, OK? Look at the link or find something more techie, (a little help, Kathryn?), and then extrapolate the idea to the business of social revolutions and you'll find my point, or at least one "quantum" facet of it. You could have a look at a representation of the Ouroborus and get the same notion to materialize in your head, maybe. The shit we've been doing has not worked, is not working, and will not work. The answers we're after will not derive from the operation we've been attempting to apply, no matter what. We compete. That's just what we do. We compete against one another, against Nature, and maybe against God, though it's not by any means compulsory for you to think of it in any sort of Divine sense, or wrestle with religious aversions for the thing to work out the same, here. That's just me. The competition we've been so avid to pursue all these generations hasn't worked

Ask, Tell, and now, Don’t Go, Don’t Kill

Denver's GLBT parade was this weekend. Was there a Free Bradley Manning contingent? It may be asking this square state too much for a Queers Against Apartheid, as seen at the coastal festivals. We have a month before Colorado Springs' pride. My idea at left.   Others: WE ARE ALL BRADLEY MANNING -- ALL OUT 4 BRADLEY MANNING, ALLEGED WIKILEAKER, GAY HERO -- SPRINGS PRIDE SAYS FREE BRADLEY MANNING -- BLOWING THE WHISTLE ON WAR CRIMES IS NOT A CRIME! -- BRADLEY MANNING: ANOTHER QUEER PRISONER WHO TOLD THE TRUTH, HE EXPOSED WAR CRIMES

Frank Bator and Princess Lisa Czeladtko

I went to his memorial service at Marian House 6 years ago. He had died in his trailer home, alone, and the body not discovered for about a week. There were a few people attending, some of the staff at Marion House, a couple of people who knew him casually, his sister and brother... A really cold and rainy day... none of the anti-homeless PEOPLE activists like Patchsi, or Janis, or Princess Lisa. See, Frank was one of those Princess Lisa and her comrades despise for our lack of funds and our extremely distasteful lack of "courtesy" in not remaining hidden from the view of "good" citizens. Like her complaint about New Life church, who are really seriously not a Liberal organization in any way... had a pizza party in a public park and didn't turn away anybody. Qu'elle Radical! I think she would have a Shit-fit if she had met any of Jesus' "council of twelve". Rough customers, the lot. Matthew, for instance, a collaborator for the Roman occupation...strangely paired with Andrew, James and Simon Peter, Zealots, revolutionaries who had taken some extremely violent actions against the Romans, like the Taliban and al Qa'eda, they were Middle Eastern Religious Extremists. Peter in particular, when he whacked off the ear of Malchus, Religious Cop from the Temple, he wasn't aiming for the ear. Malchus ducked. Peter was trying to split his wig all the way down to his neck. Standing against trained swordsmen. Republicans and Tea Party might not understand the references, they like to use violent metaphor for their sick actions but they won't get their own delicately manicured fingers dirty. But if you face somebody who has a sword and is a trained swordsman, and YOU aren't a trained swordsman, it wouldn't make any difference if you have the finest sword on the market. Training and above all EXPERIENCE trump all. If you have a sword and no training, and throw down on somebody who has training and experience and no sword, you're still toast, he'll walk away as your body is laying on the pavement in a congealing puddle of blood. He'll have your sword too. People like that would make Princess Lisa freak smooth out. Frank wasn't one. He was a disabled worker, fell from a roof in an incident remarkably like mine. He landed a little tiny bit differently and had compression fractures in his spinal column. They gave him, according to his family and others who knew him a whole lot better than I did, morphine for the pain. He didn't particularly like the "trip", few people actually do. It hurt him spiritually as well as physically and emotionally. So did the hate-filled "bum rush" treatment he no doubt received from Princess Lisa and her spiritual comrades. It's kind of an "industry standard." Much the same way she despised a man she admitted she believed was mentally ill, for daring to be in HER royal presence at the Acacia Park Pizza Party. Speaking of "parties" her own political faction-party blames the

Did Obama hear you on election day?

Here's a quarter-page size flier you can use to spread the word about tonight's event. Obama's announcement will be momentous, no matter which course of action he decides. It will be either the first sign of delivering on his promise of change, or a hopeful public betrayed. And thousands more Afghan dead. Let's not forget who suffers the most from America's reckless decisions. Come to Acacia Park tonight at 5pm. Let him hear your voice! Below is the Coloradans For Peace December 1 press release: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Colorado Springs peace community urges President Obama to chose withdrawal from Afghanistan over escalation COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO, 12/1/09 -- Coloradans For Peace (CFP) will gather with area community activists on Tuesday, December 1, at 5pm, in Acacia Park downtown, to urge President Barack Obama: NO ESCALATION OF THE WAR IN AFGHANISTAN. The nonviolent assembly in Acacia Park will be part of nationwide peace demonstrations in response to President Barack Obama's forthcoming announcement about a new US strategy in Afghanistan. National organizers include CODE PINK, UNITED FOR PEACE & JUSTICE, WORLD CAN'T WAIT, ACT NOW TO STOP WAR AND END RACISM (ANSWER), and many others. Speculation has been rising that our president intends to increase US troop levels in Afghanistan, but CFP remains hopeful that President Obama will make a decision in the spirit of his presidential campaign. We will assemble in Acacia Park in advance of the televised presidential address, in unison with other US cities, to remind the president of the electorate's call for an end to our nation's military conflicts. The CFP believes the unprecedented turnout for the 2008 election was strongly motivated by the American public's alarm over the ongoing foreign wars. We believe President Obama would be ignoring a profound mandate given him by his voters if he decided to expand the conflict in Afghanistan instead of bring it to a close. In urging an end to America's foreign occupations, citizens can show their true support for the troops. More than ever before, soldiers are contacting antiwar organizations to say that they support the peace efforts to bring them home. # # #

Obama to announce on Tuesday: surge of 34,000 body bags to Afghanistan

White House spokesmen have announced that President Obama will address the nation on Tuesday, December 1st, to declare his intention to send 25,000-34,000 additional troops to Afghanistan. Join COLORADANS FOR PEACE in Acacia Park at 5PM TUESDAY to show our vehement opposition to this plan. Explained spokesman Robert Gibbs about the week's time still needed for deliberations on Afghanistan: “It’s not just how we get people there, but what’s the strategy for getting them out.”

8 yrs in Afghanistan, still boot-counting

How is Colorado Springs marking the 8th year of war in Afghanistan? Couple choices. Visiting priest-activist Louie Vitale will speak at Colorado College on the THE MORAL DIMENSION OF DRONE WARFARE. CC students were dissuaded from hosting a peace rally on campus which might have interfered with the week's homecoming activities. Instead, beginning at 1PM Wednesday, the CC students will chalk the sidewalks of Acacia Park with the names of the 869 US soldiers killed in the Afghan campaign. Coloradans For Peace will join the boot- counting but will commemorate Afghan deaths, whose number is "n/a."

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