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Restoring honor of USAF General John Lavelle for sake of post-Vietnam war criminals

Air Force general John Lavelle fell from grace in 1971 after overseeing unauthorized bombing raids over North Vietnam. Now his family has allies trying to rehabilitate Lavelle's reputation, obfuscating his "rogue" misdeeds. If today's US air strikes can carpet bomb adversaries and collateral civilian bystanders with precision impunity, you can't blame Lavelle's champions for expecting US impunity to apply retroactively, it's only fair, in American terms.

Tea-Potty successfully test-fire Dumb Bomb, counters “Smart Bombs” nicely.

Remember the infamous Speech boycotted by whole School Districts including D-11 locally? The Hoam Skule parents, aided and abetted by the Tea-Party, in turn organized and funded by Fox News, combined to convince themselves that Education Is Satanic. Frightened Tea-Baggers kept their kids from hearing the Zombie-Brainwashing message that educational excellence is a good thing. In doing so, they set up a series of events that has led to among other school districts the Kansas City MO ISD closing half their schools, school closings are the Drug of Choice for the "conservatives" because quite simply, the only way they can hold any kind of political power is to Keep the People Ignorant. They remind me of the "Gone Tertiary" mobs in the movie "Omega Man", led by a former (until they burned down every radio and TV station as "evil") Rush Limbaugh think-alike named Matthias. With their torches and robes, burning down schools, libraries, museums, any form of culture and education, chanting "Evil! Evil! Evil! Evil!" BUT... there is a bright side to this. As painful as it seems, they're tearing their own Empire down. Already, after 8 years of Bush junior and 12 years of the Reagan/Bush Regime breaking down American Public Education into a 12 year Political Indoctrination session for each kiddo, the Pentagoons report that American kids who they wanted to recruit into the Murder Machine, aren't qualified for it anymore. They're too fat, too lazy and too damn dumb. The Fox OUTRAGE! Nation has dumbed itself into a corner. They want world-wide power, but the people they were counting on doing their fighting for them, (Because let's face it, the NeoCons ain't ever going to fight for their own gain, they have always counted on Other People to be stupid enough to do it for them and always will) got the necessary Political Indoctrination, where they're Stupid Enough to believe that they'd be "fighting for Freedom"... But it came at a price, they're also too stupid to operate advanced weaponry. And fat and lazy. This according to the Pentagon. It's a major OOPSIE!! moment for the Right WingNuts. And that damage was accomplished BEFORE the mass hysteria inflamed by the Fox Propagandists. "Evil! Evil! Evil! Evil! Evil! Evil! Evil! Evil! " They'll drag American War Technology so low that they'll never again be beaten down by Small Third World Nations like North Korea, VietNam, and Somalia. Because they'll be too stupid to find their way over there and wouldn't have enough High-Tech weaponry to make them feel safe enough to start the wars in the first place. No more being humiliated by Barefoot Armies.

Ignoble WWII bombing of Coventry commemorated with coined slur, ours

Here's a bit of WWII distortion the History Channel is passing off as, um, history. Did you know that those dirty Krauts leveled the English city of Coventry so completely that they coined a word to celebrate it? Apparently that term was "Coventrated." Oh, it's a real verb alright -- trouble is, it's English. The British intelligence office seized upon the conjugated Coventriert to mean: subjected to heavy bombardment, and pretended the Huns were such bastards they commemorated the atrocity by mocking their victims in the Teutonic dictionary. Also problematic, the barbaric Teutons failed to "coventrate" with equal efficacy anywhere else. But the Allies sure did. By night and by day, the UK and US bombers respectively "coventrated" the German and Hungarian homelands, with all the more ferocity because they were dishing the Nazis, haha, a taste of their own medicine. The bombing of Coventry was tragedy enough, and might have been ameliorated had Churchill responded to the intelligence forewarning but risk betraying that the Brits were intercepting Germany's secret ciphers. Allowing Coventry to fall victim was one of the high prices of keeping ULTRA a secret, but Hitler's choice to bomb the historic city and its famed Cathedral was to provoke much enmity with the English public. Britain's propaganda ministry was able to compound the resentment against the Germans for the devastation of Coventry by portraying the enemy as not just Philistine, but Bombast. Of course more German cities suffered under the 24-hour US-UK tag-team bombing raids, many incurring orders of magnitude greater casualties than the 600 dead of Coventry. Notable among the Axis cities was the medieval capital of Dresden which possessed not one legitimate military target. No mention of those victims in the History Channel's records of military misdeeds, meanwhile propagandist Newscorp property HarperCollins is weaving the coventriert detail for revisionist Dresden-deniers. The stories of America's firebombing of Japanese cities have already been suppressed. Apologists have long been at work justifying the use of atomic weapons against civilians in Hiroshima and Nagazaki. Where were the propagandists to conjugate Hiroshima? America's other unique bombing method would later be described minus geographical references, as simple carpet bombing. The History Channel is part of the A&E network, co-owed by warmongers Disney, Hearst and NBC/GE. Their mention of "coventrate" came in a program about Lao Tsu's Art of War, as his military edicts might have predicted, Nostradamus-like, the outcome of the Viet Nam War. Here's an example of the program's perspective: The Vietcong lost the public support of many Vietnamese when they executed thousands of South Vietnamese under the employ of the US. Meanwhile the American cause lost its public support when the US public caught sight of photographs of US war casualties. Sound like a fair comparison? The Vietnamese weren't demoralized by the millions killed in their midst, while the antiwar movement was not galvanized by the revelations of US atrocities? Right.

Imperialism, a tomb for humanity

Earlier this year we passed the 4,000 mark for US troop casualties in Iraq, and we're within a week of hitting the 1,000th US soldier death in Afghan- Pakistan. It seems as good a time as any to rediscover this Vietnam War era poster.   Western imperialism didn't meet its match in Indochina. Few could probably have imagined the voracious E Pluribus Empire would collapse instead into an intractable doomsday machine.

Beyond MLK worship: Beyond Vietnam

“A time comes when silence is betrayal. That time has come for us in relation to Vietnam.” -- Martin Luther King Beyond Vietnam: Time to Break the Silence Full text of 1967 speech below. Riverside Church, New York City, 4 April 1967 I come to this magnificent house of worship tonight because my conscience leaves me no other choice. I join with you in this meeting because I am in deepest agreement with the aims and work of the organization which has brought us together: Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam. The recent statement of your executive committee are the sentiments of my own heart and I found myself in full accord when I read its opening lines: “A time comes when silence is betrayal.” That time has come for us in relation to Vietnam. The truth of these words is beyond doubt but the mission to which they call us is a most difficult one. Even when pressed by the demands of inner truth, men do not easily assume the task of opposing their government’s policy, especially in time of war. Nor does the human spirit move without great difficulty against all the apathy of conformist thought within one’s own bosom and in the surrounding world. Moreover when the issues at hand seem as perplexed as they often do in the case of this dreadful conflict we are always on the verge of being mesmerized by uncertainty; but we must move on. Some of us who have already begun to break the silence of the night have found that the calling to speak is often a vocation of agony, but we must speak. We must speak with all the humility that is appropriate to our limited vision, but we must speak. And we must rejoice as well, for surely this is the first time in our nation’s history that a significant number of its religious leaders have chosen to move beyond the prophesying of smooth patriotism to the high grounds of a firm dissent based upon the mandates of conscience and the reading of history. Perhaps a new spirit is rising among us. If it is, let us trace its movement well and pray that our own inner being may be sensitive to its guidance, for we are deeply in need of a new way beyond the darkness that seems so close around us. Over the past two years, as I have moved to break the betrayal of my own silences and to speak from the burnings of my own heart, as I have called for radical departures from the destruction of Vietnam, many persons have questioned me about the wisdom of my path. At the heart of their concerns this query has often loomed large and loud: Why are you speaking about war, Dr. King? Why are you joining the voices of dissent? Peace and civil rights don’t mix, they say. Aren't you hurting the cause of your people, they ask? And when I hear them, though I often understand the source of their

Olbermann offers Obama an out

Keith Olbermann's Special Comment on Afghanistan is being summarized as telling President Obama to Get Out Now. Olbermann's words stir our enthusiasm, but he leaves damning loopholes as far as I am concerned. The MSNBC newsman conditions his advice to the president with "unless you are right," then at the end, showing a tact far too reckless, he tells Obama to "listen to yourself." No. That's not why we elected Barack Obama. The inexperienced senator had no record. Our hope didn't spring from a demonstration of ability. Obama was elected for the hope he offered because he appeared to be listening to the American people. It would probably have been inconceivable to imagine then that Obama could not but respond to the unprecedented surge of electoral participation prompted by George W. Bush's wars. Listen to the people Mr. Obama, and no one else. To ask Obama to listen to himself is to offer him entirely too much slack. Give an authoritarian leader too much rope, that's more rope he has to hang you. And then there is no "unless you are right." What is that but a straight man's setup? That line is for the President to show America how sure he is of his decision. The people want a leader who's offering supreme confidence, so Olbermann is holding the door. He goes on to frame the challenges posed by Afghanistan, as surmountable by a qualified prez. Olbermann invites the President to be "precisely right." Isn't that exactly what will sooth the viewers, after Obama has famously taken so much time to arrive at a decision? But there is no "unless you are right." Unless Olbermann meant it with an implied irony. But he didn't. He didn't say unless black is white, or up is down. Olbermann allowed for the possibility that an escalation could be right. "If not, Mr. President, this way lies Vietnam." IF NOT Olbermann says. Doesn't he mean no if and or buts? When Walter Cronkite finally spoke out about Vietnam, and declared the war un-winnable, it was not because it had become un-winnable. It had not transformed into a quagmire, the chance for victory had not escaped us. The illegal and immoral subjugation of the Vietnamese people was never a winnable strategy. Like Iraq and Afghanistan, it was a predictable calamity, a crime. Moral observers knew it from the beginning. America did not LOSE Vietnam, and we will not LOSE Iraq and Afghanistan. We DESTROYED those landscapes and millions of lives, and we continue to "finish the job." It's an immeasurable, apocalyptic tragedy. If Barack Obama escalates in the footsteps of Lyndon Johnson, it will similarly be no mistake. The travesty is that the American people have once again been waylaid in their determination to find a leader to represent their desire for peace. Here is the text of Keith Olbermann's Special Comment: SPECIAL COMMENT By Keith Olbermann Anchor, 'Countdown' Mon., Nov . 30, 2009 Mr. President, it now falls to you to be both former Republican Senator George Aiken and the man to whom

You have forgotten what to remember

Can someone please explain to me what it means to fly this flag? The POW-MIA flag is ubiquitous these days around veterans. Our town hall flies this black flag halfway below the Stars and Stripes. When the latter is at half mast, the former hangs indecorously low. Which reminds me of a pirate ship stalking a wavering Old Glory.   I understand POW and MIA, and "you are not forgotten." But there is no flag for the veterans, the dead or wounded, to whom does this lone flag speak and why? Since the Gulf War, the US military maintains that it loses track of none of its soldiers. We've had POWs but they've been returned, and we've had MIAs whose bodies have been found. One was recovered even recently, though it was the body of a pilot lost over Iraq, understood to have died. Casualties at sea are still sometimes unrecoverable, but at least something about American war-making proficiency now permits us to confirm deaths even sans corpus. Supposedly. US military engagements between those wars, and later, have been kept outside public scrutiny, or not officially admitted. As a result, they've added no POWs or MIAs for the home front to worry over. Which leaves Vietnam, from whose era comes the dark silhouette of a bent inmate in the shadow of a prison guard tower. According to the last report, there remain 1728 American soldiers missing in action in Indochina. They are unaccounted for -- it might be more fair to say--not missing persons, expected to turn up. During the Vietnam War, the MIA list gave hope that your soldier wasn't among the fallen. It was a hope that loved ones could cling to for even years after the fall of Siagon. On the radio, a Dick Curless hit from 1965 continued to resonate even as the war receded from memory. "Six Times a Day" told of a bride in post-WWII Germany who met the trains every day, awaiting the return of her German soldier, held by the Soviets in war-reparation labor camps until the Russians considered them to have atoned. Was this what we expected Vietnam was doing? Six times a day the trains came down from Frankfort The night he came ten years were almost through She held him close and said I knew you'd be here He said I had no doubt you'd be here too American wives were determined to wait even longer, except evidence of post-war prisoners never came. There was speculation of a cover-up, suspicions which politicians like John Kerry and John McCain do little to assuage. After the war, some believe that prisoner GIs were left behind, whom the North Vietnamese hoped to exchange for war reparations. Instead of paying, it's conjectured that the US government chose to deny the existence of those men. No American diplomat has ever confirmed the scenario, and no surviving GI has ever surfaced. The closest we've come to rescuing POWs was at the movies, when Rambo went back for a jailbreak and

Life Magazine knows Afghanistan

Why, it's the price of freedom. LIFE didn't question it in 1965, its readers know no better today. You have to destroy a village to free it. You have to cripple an enemy child before you can take him fishing.   Alanis Morissette couldn't tell from irony, and neither can America. Then and now. Americans wouldn't recognize irony if it blew up in their face 44 years later. In Vietnam in 1965, our photographers were allowed to depict US wounded. Six years into the conflict, the antiwar movement was still nascent, US GI casualties passed 2,000 (by 1966 they would quadruple), and America's worst atrocities in Southeast Asia were yet to come. This Life Magazine cover story is titled "DEEPER INTO THE VIETNAM WAR."

About Afghanistan, shoot the messenger

This time let's learn something from the travesty of Vietnam. The interests which drove US soldiers into the hamlets of Southeast Asia are directing the massacres today. We call them the hawks, as if war was mere blood sport. Though South Vietnamese collaborators were forced to flee for their lives from Saigon, their US cohorts were never held to account. This time as America extricates itself from terrorizing Afghanistan, let's note those among us with blood on our hands and prosecute. Not the soldiers, but the warmongers in the charge: those commanders who every month reported the war "is still winnable" those propagandists who blamed the failure of occupation on waning public resolve, those politicians who rationalized inhumanity, and the war industrialists, all of them.

Lt. Calley finally apologizes for My Lai

Lt. William Calley has expressed remorse for the first time for leading the 1968 My Lai Massacre. Although he still maintains he was only following orders. Calley was sentenced to life imprisonment for his role, but President Nixon commuted his punishment to three years of house arrest. Who should have been accountable for the 500 civilians executed in My Lai?

The US – Islam War nears halfway mark

I have to do more research, but I'm pretty sure October 7, 2009 should mark the HALFWAY POINT of the US-ISLAM WAR. I realize the Pentagon brass are calling for fifty years more of insurgency suppression in Afghanistan and Iraq, but if we grant them no more time than for America's longest military intervention, we've got another eight years before beating our humiliating retreat. Those who insist we could have won the Vietnam War, would have our murderous troops there still. No foreign occupation has succeeded in modern times, with the ongoing exception of Israel, which by its swallowing of Palestine has been skewing the definition of occupation to the Old Testament model of mass extermination. The treacherous method worked against the Native Americans, it may still doom the (Palestinian) Native Israelis. Afghanistan and Iraq remain occupations, where Vichy puppet governments prosecute genocide against the native resistance. How long before Americans lose their stomach for continuous bloody repression? I cannot account for the Russians in Chechnya, but on the US-Islam front, we are halfway there. In Afghanistan and Iraq, we may already have surpassed half the civilian death tolls in Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos. It's hard to say, the US "doesn't do body counts" now, and we didn't then either. Our own military casualties grew exponentially in Vietnam. If such statistics bear comparison, today's numbers cannot be but comparable. It's being whispered that American casualties are approaching a multiple of a thousand mark. Official soldier deaths in Afghanistan and Iraq are conjectured to be reaching a round number. I'm not told how many US mercenaries are being killed. We have as many hired-guns contracted as government soldiers. Want to lay odds on how many body bags they've required? Nor are we told how many US soldiers are being wounded, many of them with injuries which would not have sustained their lives in Vietnam. Surely there is a sad gray area of injury which we could round up as it approximates death.

Warmongers do end run on Vietnam Wall

WASHINGTON DC- Who knew it wasn't just the Vietnam War veterans who had misgivings about Maya Lin's design for a memorial? Fair enough it doesn't celebrate the achievements of our armies. This peripheral statue offers the more conventional bronze tribute. It depicts as addendum, three survivors emerging from the woods, disheveled and still brandishing assault rifles. They appear to regard the wall and its visitors with wariness. I recognize the faces now, they are the chicken hawks who didn't go, but still want to wage war, and had to figure out how to get America over that wall. Nearby, the WWII memorial celebrates the victors more than it commemorates the dead, it's fashioned like a stone coliseum, as might have been fashioned by the world champion rooster after an undefeated string of cockfights.

MLK: Why I am Opposed to the War

"You're too arrogant! And if you don't change your ways, I will rise up and break the backbone of your power, and I'll place it in the hands of a nation that doesn't even know my name. Be still and know that I'm God."   Sermon at the Ebenezer Baptist Church on April 30, 1967. Full text below. The sermon which I am preaching this morning in a sense is not the usual kind of sermon, but it is a sermon and an important subject, nevertheless, because the issue that I will be discussing today is one of the most controversial issues confronting our nation. I'm using as a subject from which to preach, "Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam." Now, let me make it clear in the beginning, that I see this war as an unjust, evil, and futile war. I preach to you today on the war in Vietnam because my conscience leaves me with no other choice. The time has come for America to hear the truth about this tragic war. In international conflicts, the truth is hard to come by because most nations are deceived about themselves. Rationalizations and the incessant search for scapegoats are the psychological cataracts that blind us to our sins. But the day has passed for superficial patriotism. He who lives with untruth lives in spiritual slavery. Freedom is still the bonus we receive for knowing the truth. "Ye shall know the truth," says Jesus, "and the truth shall set you free." Now, I've chosen to preach about the war in Vietnam because I agree with Dante, that the hottest places in hell are reserved for those who in a period of moral crisis maintain their neutrality. There comes a time when silence becomes betrayal. The truth of these words is beyond doubt, but the mission to which they call us is a most difficult one. Even when pressed by the demands of inner truth, men do not easily assume the task of opposing their government's policy, especially in time of war. Nor does the human spirit move without great difficulty against all the apathy of conformist thought within one's own bosom and in the surrounding world. Moreover, when the issues at hand seem as perplexing, as they often do in the case of this dreadful conflict, we're always on the verge of being mesmerized by uncertainty. But we must move on. Some of us who have already begun to break the silence of the night have found that the calling to speak is often a vocation of agony. But we must speak. We must speak with all the humility that is appropriate to our limited vision, but we must speak. And we must rejoice as well, for in all our history there has never been such a monumental dissent during a war, by the American people. Polls reveal that almost fifteen million Americans explicitly oppose the war in Vietnam. Additional millions cannot bring themselves around to support it. And even those millions who

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