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Walk Like an Egyptian, You Wish

Western pyramid-gawkers since Napoleon have denigrated modern Egypt for the backwater it had become, its great civilization long extinguished. But it was a US dictator-imposed facade, with contemporary Egyptians dismissed as oil-less lackeys of the Euro-Zionist enterprise. How does the past week of Days of Rage in Hahrir Square, a measured, peaceful uprising redubbed by Fahmi Huweidi as "the Noble Anger," reflect the immense dignity shown by a people who know they represent the heart of the Arab world?

Revolution in Egypt: cue the jackals

The struggle in Egypt between spontaneous uprising and desperate measures taken by Mubarak has become complicated by covert intelligence action. Looters have been unmasked as security agents, the police withdrew from the streets only to reappear as thugs unleashed on the vulnerable public. As the popular revolution appears irreversible, world bankers and investors are threatening to destabilize Egypt with the usual market sanctions.

Emma Goldman on Direct Action

Yes it was Emma Goldman who said "If voting changed anything, they'd make it illegal." It was no mere quip. The turn of the last century activist was a fierce advocate of every social reform and was ultimately exiled to Europe for challenging forced conscription. Do you wonder what else Goldman had to say, about political violence, prisons, patriotism, puritanism, the traffic of women, suffrage, poverty, birth control, and the struggle of minorities? Far from being a cynic, Goldman offered an alternative to the false hope of the ballot box. What does the history of parliamentarism show? Nothing but failure and defeat, not even a single reform to ameliorate the economic and social stress of the people. Laws have been passed and enactments made for the improvement and protection of labor. Thus it was proven only last year that Illinois, with the most rigid laws for mine protection, had the greatest mine disasters. In States where child labor laws prevail, child exploitation is at its highest, and though with us the workers enjoy full political opportunities, capitalism has reached the most brazen zenith. ... It may be claimed that men of integrity would not become corrupt in the political grinding mill. Perhaps not; but such men would be absolutely helpless to exert the slightest influence in behalf of labor, as indeed has been shown in numerous instances. The State is the economic master of its servants. Good men, if such there be, would either remain true to their political faith and lose their economic support, or they would cling to their economic master and be utterly unable to do the slightest good. The political arena leaves one no alternative, one must either be a dunce or a rogue. The political superstition is still holding sway over the hearts and minds of the masses, but the true lovers of liberty will have no more to do with it. Instead, they believe with Stirner that man has as much liberty as he is willing to take. ... Universal suffrage itself owes its existence to direct action. If not for the spirit of rebellion, of the defiance on the part of the American revolutionary fathers, their posterity would still wear the King's coat. If not for the direct action of a John Brown and his comrades, America would still trade in the flesh of the black man. True, the trade in white flesh is still going on; but that, too, will have to be abolished by direct action. Trade-unionism, the economic arena of the modern gladiator, owes its existence to direct action. It is but recently that law and government have attempted to crush the trade-union movement, and condemned the exponents of man's right to organize to prison as conspirators. Had they sought to assert their cause through begging, pleading, and compromise, trade-unionism would today be a negligible quantity. In France, in Spain, in Italy, in Russia, nay even in England (witness the growing rebellion of English labor unions), direct, revolutionary, economic action has become so strong

When I get my gun

If I had a gun it would serve as my point of meditation. [Excerpt, Swimming Upstream, Eve Ensler editor]   And I would look at it and re-remember Harriet Tubman's steely whisper and Nanny's ear-splitting yell, Ida B. Wells' unrelenting voice and Fannie Lou Hamer's unwavering glare. I'd remember Nat Turner's plot and Tony Morrison's advice. And when I shot my gun, my target would be well planned, my aim precise. I would know exactly who to shoot, and when and where to shoot them, and how many of their friends needed to be shot too. And when they were dead, when they were all dead, so would be oppression, globalism, neocolonialism, government, capitalism, enslavement, corporations, greed, hunger, hate, religion, war, poverty, cruelty. No no, it can't be too soon for me, the day I get my gun.

Following Right Wing political theology

Faith based politics where you have to believe fervently the dogma handed down by the High Priests of Capital... But according to their gospels of greed, there has never actually been any revolution where wealth has been redistributed to the poor from the wealthy. In other words, the wealth has been transferred from one group of heavily armed rich thieves to another. Lateral instead of Vertical economic mobility. Thus, no real Socialist state or more importantly, Socialist Economy has ever existed, at least according to the Ayn Rand Theology. Yet somehow, it's the Communists and Socialists, the ones who never had their hands on the missing bread in the first place, who crashed the economy repeatedly over the past 500 years of straight-on Capitalism. For instance the Mortgage Crisis that immediately preceded the crash of the War-expense Bloated Debt Economy. Not the approximately ten trillion dollar difference in Budget surplus projected v the budget deficit Actual. Part of that went to Enron in a pyramid scheme. To end all pyramid schemes? Nay verily. Kenny Lay died, basically in jail, ready to make the trip to Club Fed where Rich Thieves spend a few months of "hard" time. Without the money and, importantly, without ever telling anybody who exactly was holding the cash. Bush and Cheney, Suspects Prime and Secondary, generously brushed aside any suspicion of their guilt in the matter and since they controlled the Justice department, so did the DoJ. But that's not the straw that broke the camels back. Nor was the massive War Budget, unfunded save for credit, issued against Future Taxes. By putting Future in front of the word Taxes GW and his merry band of thieves managed to say that they hadn't raised Taxes. The correct and true way to put it would be that they hadn't raised CURRENT taxes. Making War Profits basically untaxable granted the richest pigs in America virtually tax free existence. Massive tax cuts to the people who make all their money on the spending of Tax Generated money. A double gift of Corporate Welfare and Corporate Warfare. But it's the Socialists who never had their hands on the bread who are to blame. With the Mortgage Crisis, one of many investment scams that went wrong all at once, people who control less than a percent of the income in America are alleged to have brought the entire house of cards down. People, I'm capable of a LITTLE bit of math, m'kay? Which would you think, logically speaking, mathematically speaking, to be more likely, that people with full control of 95% of the wealth crashing the economy or the less than a percent "controllers"? According to the Right Wing Theology, it's obviously the < 1%. Up is black, east is sideways and Oceania has ALWAYS been at war with Eastasia. Oh, and the Weathermen who are alleged to have killed 4 people, including 3 weathermen.. Are the supremely violent ones, not the Big Pigs who kick open the gates of Hell and start scooping in

Nonviolence is the refuge of cowards

I say this with the full authority of my own personal experience: nonviolence is for cowards. When push has come to shove, I stepped to the sidewalk but I am so full of admiration for those who stayed in the line of fire. Today much of the world commemorates Bastille Day, France's unique independence day, because it launched the French Revolution. Not just a revolution for the masses of humanity, but their Enlightenment. Storming the Bastilles was no small transformative event, and the sans-culottes were not led by urgings to keep it nonviolent. The monarchy took heed, as it had for every historic concession, because the citizenry had it scared to death. Have you changed social inequity by voting in the polls? Have you found justice via protest? Sought, beseeched, was as far as you got. Violent uprising has not lately looking too effective either. But it's got the track record. I'm not saying I'm up to the task, but I assure you I have the courage to be nonviolent in spades. It is a most self-aggrandizing dishonesty that holds nonviolence to be brave. There is nothing easier than to take the path of least resistance. I don't mean to downplay the audacity to protest, as opposed to conforming, although isn't sticking to your principles squarly self-indulgent? I claim no credit for failing to bend on matters of principle. In fact, sometimes I feel positively anti-social. But taken the next step, what's easier than subjecting yourself to the authority of the sword? Again it's the principle of not becoming like your abuser, another no-brainer, but no-bravery required. Standing up for what you believe? Easy-peasy. To the death? Positively cowardly lion. This is you inner dialog, be honest: I defy your authority, but only so far. I reject your physical oppression, but just kidding. I call for the total destruction of your hierarchy, but only in words, I'm entitled, and you can't lay a finger on me because I'm playing by the rules. Hope of getting anywhere: dismal. Modern social movements have only Gandhi and Mandela as purported success stories. But I'll not insult the elders. The Gandhi and Mandela of our textbooks bear no resemblance to the reality, they are false role-models put forth by fascists who want to blunt every effort to rise against power. Oh, nonviolence is the higher ideal, sure. Lovely. Browny points for the afterlife. Trickle-up transcendence has as much potential for success as awaiting extraterrestrials or building playing fields for disgraced baseball reincarnates. Unless power wants to transcend the human experience, and lift all of us with it, mankind is not going anywhere. The only way you're going to levitate powerful heads is with a guillotine. Dreadfully eighteenth century, but check out the horrific bygone days from which they're reconstituting torture and feudalism. You can probably contrive a litany of rationalizations for why it would be beneath you, but imagine picking up a gun and having a go against the overwhelming power of the state. Now that's terrifying.

Thinking outside the bomb, in the box

THINK OUTSIDE THE BOMB is a clever antiwar appropriation of Taco Bell's inventive twist, but since when does imitation break from a box? And does "the bomb" mean what it used to? By the look of their logo, the TOTB activists are not talking about the A-bomb, nor bunker-busters, nor smart-bombs, nor predator drones. Intentionally or not, they're invoking the proverbial cartoon explosive, wielded by anarchists or other insurgents, the only means by which social uprisings have ever transcended the box. "The bomb" was the feared Armageddon of the early nuclear age. More recently, "Food Not Bombs" conflates bombs with militarism because modern war-making, aka peace-keeping, is dominated by aerial bombing. Returning to "bomb" in the singular insinuates nukes, or the mutually-assured destructiveness of endlessly reciprocated violence. So let's see the bomb depicted more as a nuclear warhead or an artillery shell. Intrinsic to the plea for nonviolence is the determination to subdue the military instinct with transcendence. And when have proponents of nonviolence exerted jurisdiction over anyone but themselves? Lead by example they cry. We will defeat the barbarians by not becoming barbarians ourselves. Turn the other cheek, the meek shall inherit the earth. I rather suspect, quoth Camelot: "It's not the earth the meek inherit, it's the dirt." To warmongers I say: think. In of itself, thinking is outside the box enough for you. To peaceniks: exchanging the challenges of human reality for a spiritual realm, is a religious balm that dates to antiquity, about as inside the box as it gets.

Haiti public menace is old stereotype

Once again NMT scoops the corporate media desperate for images of menacing Haitians on the verge of violence. These 1793 engravings aimed to anger the French public against the savagery of the Haitians rising against their masters in then Colonial French St. Domingue. A detail from The Pillage of Cap François, 1793, from Brown University Archives. Another detail of the murder of French colonists. These are extracts from a tableau which depicts the eleven days of mayhem before the arrival of military reinforcements. These inflammatory scenes show whites being victimized by grotesque pig-nosed blacks, looking absurd in stolen clothing, gorging themselves with the food and drink of their masters. The same event, this is titled the Burning of Cap Français.

Water on the Moon.

Will cause an outcry from those who want to make the Moon into a missile base. Water can be made into fuel and breathable oxygen by splitting the molecule apart using a charge of direct current. Such as can be harvested from Solar Panels. On the moon there's no such thing as a cloudy day, and one side is eternally night, the other eternally day. Or close enough as to make no practical difference. This technology has been in existence for over a hundred years. Using DC for electrification was one of Edisons pet projects. He invented the Electric Chair to demonstrate the dangers of Alternating Current. Solar generation of Direct Current was one of Einstein's inventions. In 1905. It could have been as easily developed, and for a lot less money, a lot less bloodshed, and a lot less ecological and (related) Economic damage than Petroleum. Hydrogen fuel is as explosive as gasoline but without the really negative side effects, like the fumes from stored gasoline, which are lethal in many ways, depending on the number of additives. Hydrogen was used for the boosters of the Moon Rockets. It's powerful enough to run any internal combustion engine. But less economic, ecological and political damage... also meant less outrageous profits spread among the very fewest 5% of the worlds population. The profits would have been more widely distributed, just like Sunshine and Water distributed around the world by weather patterns. Weather which is the front end for Climate. It would have been, to the minds of the Super Rich, Chaos and Anarchy if they weren't in full control of the economy of the world. Imagine people being actually close to equal in wealth, and that without bloody revolution. But Standard Oil was subsidized, Solar Energy and its very real stepchild Hydrogen fuel was Not Subsidized. Welfare for the Greedy, not for the Needy. The Wealthy didn't care if the scions of the Peasantry were sacrificed in the wars "necessary" to maintain their hold on the Wealth. They themselves weren't at immediate risk, and their own children, those who couldn't buy their way out of Conscription, meant nothing to them either. In the Greed Game it's "Me me me me It's the Me Show, starring--- ME!" George Bush Senior could afford to buy W's way out of the draft and out of Combat. Easily. If it had been more expensive than he wished, he would have cut Junior loose and Junior would have been up to his ass in mud, mosquitoes and VietMinh fighters the same as the "Lower" class soldiers. They don't care about climate change any more than they care about wars, after all, they expect to be long dead by the time it causes a catastrophe. So what if THEIR kids and grandkids have to live with their bad decisions as well as ours? The Rich Pigg way of looking at his pigglets is "Oh well, it's not ME that's going to pay, big deal who cares la di da..." So we're now, even with so

Obama ate a fish who knew Lincoln

Fishermen have always called it the Slimehead fish. It's sorta-scientific name is Darwin's Slimehead. But when bottom-of-the-barrel scraping began for the ocean's remaining fisheries, fishmongers created a market for the never-thought-palatable deep bottom feeder by renaming it the Orange Roughy.   That much you've probably heard before. Really, what's in a name? A fish by any other name will smell too. Is there a fish story without hyperbole, that does not smell fishy? The idiom comes from the experience-honed doubt that the fishmonger's catch is not fresh. People know steak is dead cow, so does it matter that Orange Roughy is Slimehead, Monkfish is Goosefish, Rock Salmon is Spiny Dogfish, or Tilapia is Mouthbrooder? Actually Israeli exporters wanted to give Tilapia a biblical makeover, asserting the Tilapia from the Sea of Galilee, should be called St. Peter's Fish, but US regulators intervened. In the Gospel of Matthew 17:27, apostle Peter tells tax collectors where they can go. In more than that many words he tells them to go fish, and from the mouth of the "first fish they catch," they will find the four drachmas he owes them. The FDA didn't buy it either. By the way, if you doubt Wikipedia has Zionist preoccupations, sniff the first paragraph of their entry for Tilapia. Maybe we are about to see whether Wiki momentum can surfeit the vernacular. The US government also intervened when fish wholesalers wanted to rename the Patagonian Toothfish as Chilean Sea Bass. It's not a Bass. And the poor Teethfish, like the Slimehead, are now endangered. Because man's traditional food fishes have become depleted, we're having now to make meals of the dregs. And the populations of these deep sea dwellers have less resiliency than the coastal stocks. In the case of the Toothfish and the Slimehead, it's because they grow very slowly. The Slimehead can grow to be 150 years old. They don't become sexually reproductive until they are 33, and that's not in dogfish years. Fishing operations which harvest entire sea mounts decimate every generation at once, leaving none who can spawn. Would it give you an unsettled feeling to consume something so ancient? If we're talking a pre-Phylloxera wine, it could be a great thing. But a fish that old has been absorbing mercury from the height of the industrial revolution onwards. So there might be a health benefit for showing deference to your fish elders. It recently upset me to learn that with modern agriculture we eat cattle before they're two, when they're barely adolescent. Now I wonder what's too old. We revere elephants and tortoises for their longevity, such ancient beings we don't eat. I'm old enough to remember learning about the old carp in the fountains of Paris, who also lived quite long. French schoolchildren could marvel that some carp still lived who might have glimpsed Napoleon. A Slimehead Orange Roughy caught today could have lived in the time of Lincoln. Certainly those fish drag-netted in the 1970s, when the Orange Roughy exotic star

Three meals away from revolution

The phrase is oft quoted, but no one knows who originated it --or, even if it's true. It could just be an old pharah's wives tale. But Obama buys it: from the people who brought you hope.gov we've now come to ready.gov. Where the White House assures you there is no need to fear coming plagues and pestilence so long as you "Prepare. Plan. Stay Informed." and be sure to have food for three days. Is it three meals or nine? Is the consequence anarchy or revolution? The "truism" is commonly sited as being an old Russian expression, but it's so pithy, others guess it has a literary source like Dumas. A contemporary scholar placed it back much further: The Romans believed that civilization is never more than three meals away from anarchy. Of course, when Stalin or Trotsky are thought to have said it, the dire consequence for civilization is revolution. Which is where the saying catches the popular imagination. Internet sleuths are eager to credit the wisdom to a BBC situation comedy. "[Arnold] Rimmer said it in Red Dwarf." Although two decades before, Science Fiction authors Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle wrote in Lucifer's Hammer, that civilization is "only three meals removed from savagery." Doubtless in earlier times, you ate well if you could rely on one solid meal every day, which no doubt holds true for the majority of the world still. In the developed nations of course, we cannot see ourselves subsisting on less than three. The makers of the documentary King Corn interviewed Senator Chuck Grassley about America's food supply, which is where the expression piqued my interest. Grassley explained: “A society is always nine meals away from a revolution. If you have people going without food for three days and there are enough of them out there, they will revolt.” Like the "300 pound gorilla" which has now become 900lbs, the units have indexed with man's inflated prosperity, likewise the vicarious sense that salvation from inequity might come by revolution. A better educated Briton is thought to have coined the nine meals abstraction. At the height of last year's food crisis, it was recalled that Lord Cameron of Dillington, in his capacity of head of the UK's Countryside Agency, coined version 2.0 "nine meals from anarchy." The distinction between anarchy and revolution was noted by Fredick Upham Adams in 1896, unearthed by Wikiquotes, who speculated on the veracity of the concept: ...I realize that the spirit of liberty does not exist in hungry men. People talked about a day coming when the people would become so hungry and desperate that they would rise in a revolution and sweep all before them. Such a day will never come. Hungry men may fight, but it will be for a bone—not for liberty. The perpetuity of liberty rests with those who eat three square meals a day. Of course, Maslow would later quantify this with his hierarchy of needs, but I think modern man clings to the revolutionary idyll over anarchy because it gives

Michael Moore CAPITALISM postscript

From Michael Moore: "15 Things Every American Can Do Right Now:" > Friends, It's the #1 question I'm constantly asked after people see my movie: "OK -- so NOW what can I DO?!" You want something to do? Well, you've come to the right place! 'Cause I got 15 things you and I can do right now to fight back and try to fix this very broken system. Here they are: FIVE THINGS WE DEMAND THE PRESIDENT AND CONGRESS DO IMMEDIATELY: 1. Declare a moratorium on all home evictions. Not one more family should be thrown out of their home. The banks must adjust their monthly mortgage payments to be in line with what people's homes are now truly worth -- and what they can afford. Also, it must be stated by law: If you lose your job, you cannot be tossed out of your home. 2. Congress must join the civilized world and expand Medicare For All Americans. A single, nonprofit source must run a universal health care system that covers everyone. Medical bills are now the #1 cause of bankruptcies and evictions in this country. Medicare For All will end this misery. The bill to make this happen is called H.R. 3200. You must call AND write your members of Congress and demand its passage, no compromises allowed. 3. Demand publicly-funded elections and a prohibition on elected officials leaving office and becoming lobbyists. Yes, those very members of Congress who solicit and receive millions of dollars from wealthy interests must vote to remove ALL money from our electoral and legislative process. Tell your members of Congress they must support campaign finance bill H.R.1826. 4. Each of the 50 states must create a state-owned public bank like they have in North Dakota. Then congress MUST reinstate all the strict pre-Reagan regulations on all commercial banks, investment firms, insurance companies -- and all the other industries that have been savaged by deregulation: Airlines, the food industry, pharmaceutical companies -- you name it. If a company's primary motive to exist is to make a profit, then it needs a set of stringent rules to live by -- and the first rule is "Do no harm." The second rule: The question must always be asked -- "Is this for the common good?" (Click here for some info about the state-owned Bank of North Dakota.) 5. Save this fragile planet and declare that all the energy resources above and beneath the ground are owned collectively by all of us. Just like they do it in Sarah Palin's socialist Alaska. We only have a few decades of oil left. The public must be the owners and landlords of the natural resources and energy that exists within our borders or we will descend further into corporate anarchy. And when it comes to burning fossil fuels to transport ourselves, we must cease using the internal combustion engine and instruct our auto/transportation companies to rehire our skilled workforce and build mass transit (clean buses, light rail, subways, bullet trains, etc.) and new cars that

“Not hate, Heritage” and other lies.

Speaking of course, of the Confederate Battle Flag. The "Southern Cross". Rejected as a candidate for the United States Flag due to its Religious implications (two of the three crosses on the flag, the cross of St Andrew and the cross of St Patrick, half of the four crosses on the Union Jack British flag) being very uncomfortable reminders of the Christian-on-Christian multi-million counts of Murder which led directly in to the Revolution, and in the confusion of battle and especially the thick smoke from black-powder muskets, pistols, rifles and cannon it looked too much like British regimental flags. The local Wreligious Wrong who dispute the notion that there was any dissent among the "founding fathers" over what Bush called "the bridge between Church and State" gloss over that bit. Truth gets in their way so they ignore it. Then in the American Civil war, it still was never the official flag of the Confederacy and got to be the Battle Flag simply because it didn't look like the Stars and Stripes in the aforementioned Smoke from the cannons. That and the Confederacy liked the Religious symbolism and the Racist symbolism (Scots and Irish were, after all, White, and the Rich Rebels wanted to convince the Poor Rebels that they were carrying on some Great Celtic Traditional Struggle) embraced by people who were convinced politically and religiously that there was nothing wrong with Racism or Slavery. And the official Confederate flag, the Stars and Bars, DID look a whole lot like the U.S. flag under battlefield conditions. Kind of the forebears of the Retardican Tea-Party types who claim that it's not Hatred of anybody,  just, you know, the natural superiority of the White Race entitled them to hold the Darker races in slavery. Not that the Darker Races were inferior, you know, it's just that the White Race is better. See, that kind of "logic" pans out among the Tea-Party type of Mental and Morally Deficient Socially Retarded Animated Sphincters. So what got me going on this, and really, Southerners acting stupidly and claiming that ALL (real) Southerners are as stupid as they are is a Pet Peeve that's so familiar to me that I feed it and give it a name, and take it to the vet regularly... Aside from the Racists of the Tea-Party waving it around and claiming it to be the Flag of Freedom (unless, you know, you happen to be a Slave in which case you're not Human to their eyes so you don't count) Some Retard in the parking lot of King Soopers had a bumper sticker (nothing unusual about that) but this one had the POW propaganda flag along with the Confederate Southern Cross and saying "This Flag would never have left you behind". The POW camps run by both the Confederate and Union Armies, for instance, made the worst examples of Nazi or Communist prison camps pale by comparison. For another "for instance" the North VietNamese actually released the American POWS. So the POW flag and the Confederate flag being used in

Che lives in the Florence Supermax

Thursday Oct 8 is Cuba's Day of the Heroic Guerrilla. By a brilliant coincidence perhaps, Colorado Springs is currently plastered with fliers of the heroic guerrilla himself, smiling from the windows of the least likely businesses, courtesy of the Smokebrush Gallery's current exhibit. The sketch of Che is by artist/poet Antonio Guerrero, member of the Cuban 5 and inmate 58741-004 of the Florence Supermax. Che's image has been successfully trivialized as a commercial icon, thanks to the Gap et al, but when Che jumps off the T-shirt, in the incarnation of Hugo Chavez or Evo Morales, the revolution lives.

Sept 11 – America Reaps What It Sows!

A post-911 perspective by Black Liberation Army prisoner of war Jalil Muntaqim. U.S. International Warfare Initiates World War III Human Rights During Wartime By Jalil A. Muntaqim In the aftermath of the September 11, 2001, attack on the World Trade Center and Pentagon, Americans have displayed their true colors of jingoism, a militaristic spirit of nationalism. Similarly, it was witnessed how the people of Iraq rallied in support of their President, Saddam Hussein, after the U.S. bombed to death 250,000 Iraqis, and continued devastation of that country with collateral damage of 1 million dead women and children. Hence, people rallying in support of their government and representatives is a common phenomenon when a country is attacked by an outsider. The U.S. has been foremost in the world extending foreign policy of free-market economy, to the extent of undermining other countries cultures and ideologies expressed as their way of life. Such conflicts inevitably positions the U.S. as the centerpiece, the bulls-eye for international political dissent, as indicated by demonstrations against the U.S. controlled IMF, WTO and World Bank conferences. The attack on the World Trade Center and Pentagon did not occur in a vacuum. The people that carried out the attacks were not blind followers or robots with an irrational hatred of the U.S. peoples. Rather, this attack was part of an overall blowback to U.S. imperialist policy in support of zionist Israel and opposition to fundamentalist Islam. There are essentially three primary world ideologies or world views: the capitalist free-market economy/democracy; the socialist production economy; and Islamic theocratic government, of which has been in competition for many decades. However, in the last 20 years the socialist economies has been severely subverted and co-opted by free-market economies, the ideals of American style democracy. This isolated, for the most part, Islamic theocratic ideology and system of government as the principle target of the U.S. in its quest for world hegemony. This reality of competing world views and economies is further complicated due to religious underpinning of beliefs that motivates actions, especially as they are expressed by U.S. and Western European christianity and Israel zionist judaism in opposition to Islam. From the struggles of the Crusades to the present confrontation, the struggle for ideological supremacy reigns, as the faithful continue to proselytize in the name of the Supreme Being. When geopolitics are combined with religious fervor in the character of nationalist identity and patriotism, rational and logical thinking is shoved aside as matters of the moment takes historical precedents. It has often been said that "Truth Crush to the Earth Will Rise Again". Since truth is relative to ones belief, can it be safely said that America has reaped what it has sowed? The American truth of capitalist christian democracy and its imperialist hegemonic aspirations has crushed both socialist and Islamic world views. It has extended its avaricious tentacles as the world police and economic harbinger of all that is beneficent, in stark denial of its history as a purveyor of genocides, slavery and colonial violence.

Rock Creek Free Press available in COS

The Rock Creek Free Press is available online, but if you want it in print, the DC monthly is available in Colorado Springs at the Bookman, 3163 W. Colorado. The September issue features a speech given by legendary Australian journalist John Pilger on July 4th in San Francisco. Here's the RCFP transcript: Two years ago I spoke at “Socialism in Chicago” about an invisible government which is a term used by Edward Bernays, one the founders of modern propaganda. It was Bernays, who in the 1920s invented public relations as a euphemism for propaganda. And it was Bernays, deploying the ideas of his uncle Sigmund Freud, who campaigned on behalf of the tobacco industry for women to take up smoking as an act of feminist liberation calling cigarettes “tortures of freedom”. At the same time he was involved in the disinformation which was critical in overthrowing the Arbenz government in Guatemala. So you have the association of cigarettes and regime change. The invisible government that Bernays had in mind brought together all media: PR, the press, broadcasting, advertising and their power of branding and image making. In other words, disinformation. And I suppose I would like to talk today about this invisible government’s most recent achievement, the rise of Barrack Obama and the silencing of much of the left. But all of this has a history, of course and I’d like to go back, take you back some forty years to a sultry and, for me, very memorable day in Viet Nam. I was a young war correspondent who had just arrived in a village in the Central Highlands called Tuylon. My assignment was to write about a unit of US Marines who had been sent to the village to win hearts and minds. “My orders,” said the Marine Sergeant, “are to sell the American way of liberty, as stated in the Pacification Handbook, this is designed to win the hearts and minds of folks as stated on page 86.” Now, page 86 was headed in capital letters: WHAM (winning hearts and minds). The Marine Unit was a combined action company which explained the Sergeant, meant, “We attack these folks on Mondays and we win their hearts and minds on Tuesdays.” He was joking, of course, but not quite. The Sergeant, who didn’t speak Vietnamese, had arrived in the village, stood up on a Jeep and said through a bullhorn: “Come on out everybody we’ve got rice and candies and toothbrushes to give you.” This was greeted by silence. “Now listen, either you gooks come on out or we’re going to come right in there and get you!” Now the people of Tuylon finally came out and they stood in line to receive packets of Uncle Ben’s Miracle Rice, Hershey Bars, party balloons, and several thousand toothbrushes. Three portable, battery operated, yellow, flush lavatories were held back for the arrival of the colonel. And when the colonel arrived that evening, the district chief was summoned and the yellow, flush lavatories unveiled. The colonel

the food revolution starts here. only the healthy will survive.

There is a spate of recent films spilling the beans about the corporate takeover of the global food economy. Many are available online or through Amazon and Netflix.   Please watch some of these. Show your kids. Host a screening in your community. Donate a copy or two to the local library or public school system. Encourage teachers to show the films. Spread the word! Subvert the dominant food paradigm! Refuse to play along anymore! Food, Inc., the first enviro-food movie to be screened in major theaters across the country, has brought food consciousness in the United States to a new level. Fresh: The Movie is the perfect follow-up screening to Food, Inc. because it shows the flip side—positive change being created by farmers, students, thinkers, and business people in the U.S. today. French Fries to Go documents Telluride, Colorado's quest to run city buses on recycled fryer oil. Garden Cycles: Faces From the New Farm is the story of three women on a three-month bicycle-powered tour of urban gardens throughout the Northeast. Polycultures: Food Where We Live looks at communities in Northeast Ohio that are coming together to grow a more sustainable, just, and local food system. The Greening of Southie is about Boston's first LEED-certified residential green building and the way it affected a community. Eating Alaska is a documentary by a vegetarian filmmaker who moves to Alaska and marries a hunter. The film looks at the ethics behind food choices and how politics, society, religion, and taste all play a role. Sustainable Table: What's on Your Plate? traces West Coast food production from field to table. To Market to Market to Buy a Fat Pig tours outstanding farmers' markets from Baltimore to Hawaii. The Real Dirt of Farmer John looks at one man and his family farm. Farmer John and his story will have you reconsidering stereotypes about farmers. The Garden examines the largest community garden in the U.S., 14 acres of green in South Central Los Angeles, and the fight to keep it there. The World According to Monsanto looks at this behemoth of a multinational agricultural biotech corporation and their dominance of patents on genetically engineered seeds and pesticides. Seeds of Deception focuses on how genetically engineered food is making its way into our daily diets. Bad Seed: The Truth About Our Food looks at who is controlling the world's food supply and the consequences of genetically modified food on health. The Future of Food examines the complex web of market and political forces that affect what we eat and what we will eat in the future. Food Matters takes a look at the often overlooked connection between food and our nation's current state of health. With the health-care debate raging, watching this film feels extra-timely and important. King Corn investigates the staggering scale of the corn related food economy in the U.S. in an entertaining way. While you're at it check out Carey's two part quest to go corn free. Two Angry Moms shows two angry (and awesome) moms striving to improve school lunch with simple changes, like having fresh fruits

From whence shines that Bat Signal?

It's a droll cartoon, calling Twitter to the rescue. But I believe MARSDEN got the metropolis wrong. It's Paris, London or Amsterdam, and French and English diplomats are in an Iranian court today because Tehran suspects the Green Revolutionists are being stirred up from points international.   The telecommunications companies could clear this up, if they weren't themselves eager to reform Iran's economy to favor capitalism unfettered by Islamic morality. The US antiwar community in particular is split on whether to play along with the charade. Secular freedoms are good, but are there real verifiable indications that Iran's populace wants them? On the one side, the Campaign for Peace and Democracy is cracking the whip to keep the usual pacifists in line. They've issued talking points to refute criticisms that the CPD effort in Pax Americana disguised. Here are their straw questions: 1. Was the June 12, 2009 election fair? 2. Isn't it true that the Guardian Council is indirectly elected by the Iranian people? 3. Was there fraud, and was it on a scale to alter the outcome? 4. Didn't a poll conducted by U.S.-based organizations conclude that Ahmadinejad won the election? 5. Didn't Ahmadinejad get lots of votes from conservative religious Iranians among the rural population and the urban poor? Might not these votes have been enough to overwhelm his opponents? 6. Hasn't the U.S. (and Israel) been interfering in Iran and promoting regime change, including by means of supporting all sorts of "pro-democracy" groups? 7. Has the Western media been biased against the Iranian government? 8. Is Mousavi a leftist? A neoliberal? What is the relation between Mousavi and the demonstrators in the streets? 9. Is Ahmadinejad good for world anti-imperialism? 10. Is Ahmadinejad more progressive than his opponents in terms of social and economic policy? Is he a champion of the Iranian poor? 11. What do we want the U.S. government to do about the current situation in Iran? 12. What should we do about the current situation in Iran? 13. Is it right to advocate a different form of government in Iran? The response to question one is amusing: 1. Was the June 12, 2009 election fair? Even if every vote was counted fairly, this was not a fair election. 475 people wished to run for president, but the un-elected Guardian Council, which vets all candidates for supposed conformity to Islamic principles, rejected all but 4. Free elections also require free press, free expression, and freedom to organize, all of which have been severely curtailed." Now, can they say the exact same thing about US elections? But they haven't, nor have the CPD addressed Peace and Democracy issues anywhere but Iran. Taking the admittedly lonely side is the Monthly Review, where academic Edward Herman can easily parry the CPD's rationalizations. Didn't it used to be illegal to spend government monies to propagandize the American public? Someone wants a war with Iran, and their using do-gooder grass-roots to sell it.

US journalists! Visit scenic Kurdistan!

US media correspondents, reporters, tv anchors and news directors, get yourselves to scenic Kurdistan asap, visit the mountains of Sulaimania, the waterfalls of Ahmed Awa are apparently recommended. Embeds, lead the way! It may be the only way all you war propagandists will reap what you so justly deserve. I can't imagine there's a single corporate media journalist who wouldn't be hard pressed to defend the pro-war filter he or she puts on the news for US domestic consumption. Corporate tools? They're military industrial pitchmen. Advocating death and dismemberment without restraint. Let them plead ignorance. Bullshit. I'd love to see Bill Clinton make a case for all of them. Antiwar voices are split on whether to charge MSM collaborators for war crimes, for selling the Anglo world on patently illegal wars. But how else are we to be rid of them? America remains locked in a Vulcan mind meld with these impudent, immoral careerists. Perhaps apprehension by the Iranians, and a trial by revolutionary council, is the only justice they might ever meet. Dispatch them to Kurdistan: Assignment Iran! Let the Persians teach Americans the only way to deal with poisonous snakes. The media song now, to spin the recent errant three in the best light, is that Kurdistan was not an unthinkable destination for tourists such as they, and perfectly safe too. Unless you venture toward the Iran border, where US commandos have been raiding Iranian infrastructure, while the US Navy taunts the Iranian coast in full force. Alas, Kurdistan, quite happy with its undeclared sovereignty from Iraq, has proven to be a safe haven for Anglos. I remember a most heartbreaking scene from the first month of the war, recorded by an independent American photographer as he worked his way through Kurdistan. Perhaps you recall it. Do I mean the friendly fire, or accidental, I'm not sure which to put in quotes, bombing which killed coalition troops, but also took out a Kurd ally who may have turned out to rival a more favored ally? No, not that one. Our photographer was making his second entry into Iraq as I recall, and documented a personal incident thus. He was traveling with a Kurd escort, when an Iraqi combatant broke through with a grenade, determined to blow himself up next to the American. And I should clarify, I was not rooting against the photographer, but-- here's what happened. The Iraqi was being held off by a Kurd fighter, but he had pulled the pin on the grenade, and leaned against his opponent, dooming both of them if the Kurd dared to shoot him. The scene unfolded in the progression of stills the photographer snapped as he hastened away. The Iraqi was chest to chest with the Kurd, pleading to be let to get the American. I interpreted his entreaties to say: Brother let me pass, I must reach the American, I have no quarrel with you, let me die with the infidel. The Kurd seemed for a moment to consider the words of his Iraqi brother.

Georgian Saakashvili, the anti Putin

He rode to power on a CIA/USAID/CPD-backed colored revolution (Georgia's was Rose), he invaded South Ossetia at NATO's prompting, but Mikheil Saakashvili startled when Russian tanks immediately took it back, and the Georgian president hasn't stopped screaming for western support. He's still fretting over something the Russian Prime Minister had uttered during that engagement. Didn't it seem, last August, that Saakashvili wanted to give Georgia back and return to his safe American home? He dared let US special ops advisers give Georgian soldiers insurgency training, but when the people of South Ossetia resisted falling into the sphere of western oil interests, Saakashvili went crying to mommy. There is probably no denying that Russia will not abide a US puppet playing host to western terrorist subversives at its border. But Putin has been mum on the matter, choosing instead to parade about shirtless. We're laughing at the Fabio act, but Putin's foe in Georgia is shaking like he anticipates the pig scene from Deliverance in his future. Saakashvili is raising the alarm, explaining Georgia's vulnerability. Says he, “Putin has to break our neck. He has to fulfill his solemn pledge to hang me by a certain part of the body.” Last year, during talks to end the conflict in South Ossetia, Putin had told French President Sarkozy that he wanted to hang Saakashvili “by the balls.” Has the US no better contender to foist upon the newly westernized Georgians than sissy Saakashvili? They should have auditioned candidates with their shirts off.

The Spirit of Revolt

There are periods in the life of human society when revolution becomes an imperative necessity, when it proclaims itself as inevitable. New ideas germinate everywhere, seeking to force their way into the light, to find an application in life. These ideas are opposed by the inertia of those whose interest it is to maintain the old order; they suffocate in the stifling atmosphere of prejudice and traditions. The accepted ideas of the constitution of the state, of the laws of social equilibrium, of the political and economic interrelations of citizens, can hold out no longer against the implacable criticism which is daily undermining them?…?Political, economic and social institutions are crumbling. The social structure, having become uninhabitable, is hindering, even preventing, the development of seeds which are being propagated within its damaged walls and being brought forth around them. The need for a new life becomes apparent. The code of established morality, that which governs the greater number of people in their daily life, no longer seems sufficient. What formerly seems just is now felt to be a crying injustice. The morality of yesterday is today recognized as revolting immorality. The conflict between new ideas and old traditions flames up in every class of society?…?the popular conscience rises up against the scandals which breed amidst the privileged and leisured, against the crimes committed in the name of “the law of the stronger,” or in order to maintain these privileges. Those who long for the triumph of justice, those who would put new ideas into practice, are soon forced to recognize that the realization of their generous, humanitarian and regenerating ideas cannot take place in a society thus constituted. They perceive the necessity of a revolutionary whirlwind which will sweep away all this rottenness, revive sluggish hearts with its breath and bring to mankind that spirit of devotion, self-denial and heroism, without which society sinks through degradation and vileness into complete disintegration. In periods of frenzied haste toward wealth, of feverish speculation and of crisis, of the sudden downfall of great industries and the ephemeral expansion of other branches of production, of scandalous fortunes amassed in a few years and dissipated as quickly, it becomes evident that the economic institutions which control production and exchange are far from giving to society the prosperity which they are supposed to guarantee. They produce precisely the opposite result. Instead of order they bring forth chaos; instead of prosperity, poverty and insecurity; instead of reconciled interests, war – a perpetual war of the exploiter against the worker, of exploiters and of workers among themselves. Human society is seen to be splitting more and more into two hostile camps, and at the same time to be subdividing into thousands of small groups waging merciless war against each other. Weary of these wars, weary of the miseries which they cause, society rushes to seek a new organization. It clamors loudly for a complete remodeling of the system of property ownership, of production, of exchange all economic relations which spring from

Lessons from antiwar antecedents

I have for several weeks been submerged in the writings and poster art of the revolutionary sixties, and I'll catch my breath to say this to the Antiwar Now from the Anti-Imperialists Then. We won no victory with the fall of Saigon, the Vietnam War wasn't ended by protests, bombs, or the fragging of front line officers. The portend is good for those hoping to see the end of the War on Islam, but on the whole it is not. The conflict in Vietnam ended when the ammunition ran out. The military industry spent its wad as it earned its wad. Lucrative mission accomplished. Gun nut thrillcraft ride over. American public opinion turned against the mass killing, the funding dried up, and the hawks receded with their loot. Then public attention diverted to more selfish worries. The economy. An energy crisis. A surge of concern for a death spiral into environmental disaster. Does this sound familiar? FUCKING A! Legitimate concerns all, then and now. The problems remain the same. Just as American imperialism will persist unabated. Scholars might say after Vietnam, American militarism had to be tempered, such that the US was compelled to conduct its counter-insurgency genocides by more discrete means. Like the Red, White and Blue ordnance jamboree of Southeast Asia, the US-Islam War will expend itself. But the war of the capitalist white against indigenous brown will continue unless the Western populations step up to a serious rise in consciousness. Not a higher spiritual conscience, but an honest self-assessment of First-World selfishness.

Who killed Neda Agha-Soltan?

The video footage is shocking. An attractive young woman watching the demonstrations in Tehran is struck by a sniper's bullet and dies before several video cameras. The tragedy is projected unto Facebook and Youtube, with advocates hoping it will galvanize (American) public support for the brave reform movement in Iran. News accounts blame "Basij snipers" on the rooftops. Other protesters have been killed in confrontations with Iranian riot police, without the benefit of video witnesses, much like two million Iraqis, Afghans, Pakistanis et al. Poor 27-year-old bystander Neda Soltani stood at the quite improbable convergence of bullet and camera --correction-- cameras. I don't have to suggest the scene was staged; whether or not the triggerman was an American is immaterial. Think about just the improbability of your seeing this video. When was the last time the mainstream press has circulated a snuff film? The average person is embarrassed to watch a person die. It's exploitive. Even when America was fixated on beheaded hostages, our television gatekeepers refused to broadcast the footage. Many horrific war killing moments have found their way unto Youtube, which antiwar activists could only hope would find wider distribution, if only to bring home the inhumanity of our soldiers' deeds. It never happens. The western press is running with this story because it demonizes the apparently naked inhumanity of Islam. Muslims stone women, hang gays, look: the bastards shoot their own people arbitrarily. Curiously our media doesn't make hay with the hapless victims of US snipers. The Neda Soltani snuff footage hit internet shores prepackaged with a smiling mug, and a name that translated means "the voice." Could a casting director have picked a better title character to represent Iran's repressed? The western press is even poised to outdo the Muslims in indignant piety, already lauding Neda as a martyr, whom we are informed should launch a thousand Shiite funeral processions. Western pundits compare Neda to the first Shiite martyr, the grandson of Mohammed himself. Of course, also showing excessive Islamic sensitivity, western reporters readily dismiss the vanishing of Neda's body, to the Muslim tradition of hasty burials. For the record, in case you missed it, Neda dies onscreen from an apparent gunshot. We do not see the bullet strike, nor now can anyone habeas corpus. If the scenario was acted entirely, given the success with which the girl's face is being made into an icon, young Neda's life is probably as utterly expendable now as already depicted. You think you're mourning Neda now, imagine her fate if this is a hoax. OR the gunman could just as well have been a US black-op hit-man who had his eye on the videographers approaching innocent Neda. The US military has long admitted that special forces are already operating in Iran. If the Iranian forces are shooting civilian protesters, what's the harm of helping them out where there's a camera ready? When we're not meant to see it, the soldiers shoot the cameramen too. It could be the work of Moussavi henchmen, who are

High Country Earth First Denver Meeting

High Country Earth First is hosting the EF! ROADSHOW, in DENVER, May 25-26: Monday 2pm in Cheesman Park, and Tuesday 6pm at the Gypsy House.   Four ongoing EF! projects in Colorado: DENVER: Stop I-70 Expansion through North Denver; SAN LUIS VALLEY: Halt gas drilling in Baca National Wildlife Refuge: and WESTERN SLOPE: Red Cliff mine campaign and Feral Futures (May 24 - June 7). From "Rockslide," High Country Earth First! The need for resistance in solidarity with the wild has never been louder or clearer than it is today; the EF! roadshow is a great tool for growing that resistance. There are countless examples to draw from in the story of radical movements before us: militant labor organizing tours, anti-fascist resistance recruitment and international speaking tours to build cross-border solidarity. The origin of Earth First! itself is credited to a few roadshows that kicked it all off in the early 1980s. We are building on this tradition; akin to a fellowship crossing Middle Earth to amass insurgents to face Mordor head-on. List-serves and websites aren’t enough This Roadshow’s primary intention is to strengthen our radical grassroots ecological network. For almost 30 years, we have been an organized voice bridging conservation biology with grassroots community organizing, road blockading and eco-sabotage. In the past 5 years we have seen numbers and experience-level in the EF! movement decline drastically. Yet, our place has never been more urgent. New groups are popping up across the country, but they are detached from many of the groups, history, and skills that came before them. We can’t afford to stumble and make the same mistakes over again. We are at the tail end of a decade where corporate globalization rooted itself in the US and spread across the planet like a plague. And now that the reality of climate change is finally sinking into the mainstream consciousness, the same superpowers that pushed so-called ‘free trade’ policies to exploit wild nature more efficiently are promoting carbon trading in attempt to make a profitable industry out of the disasters they’ve created. The spineless Big Green environmental NGOs are scrambling for crumbs and cutting deals with the industry for shallow public relations victories. Earth First! must rise and recognize that it’s presence is a strong component of making the broader environmental movement truly effective. We are its spine, or as an EF! co-founder, Howie Wolke, has put it, we are the lions of a movement ‘ecosystem’. Our niche is critical, and its presence (or absence) is felt deeply by our surroundings. We need to reconnect the multi-generational aspect of Earth First! that has fallen by the wayside in recent years. We need to broaden our network’s base—from radical rural grandparents to revolutionary urban youth. We need re-establish lost relationships with scholars and scientists who resonate with us. We need to re-inspire musicians and artists to contribute their passion to our battles. When it comes down to it, solid movements are based on strong personal relationships; and real relationships don’t go very far over the internet. We need face-to-face

Reenacting wars of colonial imperialism

COLORADO SPRINGS, 1776. District 12 elementary school 5th graders reenacted a couple Revolutionary War battles, where the heretofore unstoppable Red Coats fought in vain to crush the American insurgency. Aided by Awakening Councils of British Loyalists, the English troops threw overwhelming force against Colonial militias who would not fight fair. Comprised mainly of army irregulars, dressed often as ordinary civilians, because they were, the "American" rebels would not renounce terrorist tactics, human shields and unconventional warfare. British soldiers were conscripted from among the families who could afford neither education or apprenticeships to the skilled trades. Whereas their Tory collaborator were from the colonies' wealthy landowners. The British armies represented a coalition from client states of the empire, such as the Scottish Highlanders. These occupation forces supplemented their number with private contractor mercenaries, the professionally equipped, widely despised Hessians. The Continental insurgency was accused of including foreign fighters. British military superiority was overwhelming, wherever they concentrated their forces, the rebels withdrew. But there were never enough British soldiers deployed to hold the entire countryside. The American Freedom Fighters were assisted by France, home of "French Fries," later called "Freedom Fries," and the Statue of Liberty. After eight long years of far flung military engagements, incurring an insurmountable national debt, the English conceded victory to the separatists in what became known as the American War of Independence. EPILOG: Playing the heavy in a reenactment of the US patriotic struggle against British occupation, was not so bad as playing a turncoat. Most Americans look back and picture themselves having been Lexington Minutemen, or Kentucky Rangers or Continental Marines, but many of our forefathers fought against the patriots. The more ignoble among the collaborators were: Simcoe's Queen's Rangers, the Loyal Irish Volunteers, the New Jersey Volunteers, Brant's Volunteers, Butler's Rangers, Caldwell's Company, Docksteader’s Rangers, DeLancey’s Brigade, Brewerton's Company, the King’s Royal Regiment, the Loyal American Regiment, the Royal American Volunteers, the Queen’s Rangers, and Tarleton’s British Legion. POSTSCRIPT: Reports of atrocities were dismissed as enemy propaganda. Evidence emerges later of what happens when infantry are left to their own initiative. Witness: stretcher-bearers and wounded come upon a British patrol coming off the lunch-hour, and are put to the bayonet.

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